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Waverley Borough Council Committee System - Committee Document

Meeting of the Environment and Leisure Overview and Scrutiny Committee held on 17/04/2007
Research Into Possible Adverse Health Impacts From Alternate Weekly Waste Collections



ANNEXE 2

Research Into Possible Adverse Health Impacts From Alternate Weekly Waste Collections.

Copy of defra news story of 16th March 2007, concerning publication of researsh funded by the defra Waste Implementation Programmge about possible Health impacts from Alternate Weekly Collections:


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No adverse health impacts from alternate weekly waste collections

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Research into alternate week waste collection shows there would be no adverse effects on health.
The research, published today (16 March), looked into possible effects of collecting recyclable waste one week and residual waste the next. Areas where recyclables and residual waste are already collected on alternate weeks have seen an increase the amount of recycling achieved.
The report concludes that common sense measures such as keeping waste tightly wrapped and bin lids closed would help combat potential increases in odour, insects or other nuisance.
Councillor Paul Bettison, chairman of the Local Government Association’s Environment Board, said:
"Councils are on the frontline in the fight against climate change and working hard to reduce the amount of waste sent to landfill. Authorities introducing alternate bin collections make the decision based on what will work best in their unique local circumstances. Councils bringing in the scheme work with residents to make sure they know about the changes and how to dispose of their waste. As long as people use their bins properly, the system is efficient and hygienic.
"Local authorities are using every tool in their arsenal to make sure that council tax is kept down and the environment is protected. Alternate week collection is one of those tools. It is proven to increase the amount of recycling achieved and reduce the level of waste sent to landfill.”
        Further information
The research was commissioned by South East Waste Advisory Group and funded by Defra’s Waste Implementation Programme. It was carried out by Enviros Consulting Ltd and Cranfield University. See the report on Enviros Consulting's website.
See also the waste and recycling pages on this site.
Page published:16 March 2007
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