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Waverley Borough Council Committee System - Committee Document

Meeting of the Executive held on 13/06/2006
Draft Housing Strategy 2005 - 2010




Waverley Borough Council
Draft Housing Strategy 2005-2010

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1. Foreword 4
2. Executive Summary 6
3. Introduction 8
4. Wider Priorities and Partnership Working 9 5. housing Demand 18 6. HOUSING SUPPLY 28 7 HOUSING STOCK CONDITION 31 8. RESOURCES 37 9. PRIORITIES 48
10. OPTIONS 51
11. MONITORING AND MEASURING THE HOUSING STRATEGY 53
12. ACTION PLAN 56
13. PROGRESS TO DATE 76
14. APPENDICES 79
1. Foreword

Waverley’s Housing Strategy brings together the issues that face the Borough in respect of housing.

Housing is a major issue for Waverley. High property prices mean that many people on average incomes cannot afford to rent or buy a home in the Borough. Strong planning policies, intended to protect our beautiful environment mean that relatively few homes are build in Waverley each year – thus limiting supply, as demand increases. We are relatively close to London and people are moving into to Waverley to improve their of quality of life, whilst continuing to work in the capital. All of this puts pressure on the local housing market and impacts on local people.

At the same time, national policy is undergoing major changes:

· Regional Housing Boards have been set up to devise regional strategies and allocate grant for affordable homes. There is a focus on large scale development in clearly identified ‘growth areas’;

· The Planning System is being changed and developers are being expected to provide more community benefit from new developments, including affordable housing. Whilst welcomed in many respects, this means a change of culture and expectation for developers, landowners, and local authorities;

· The Government is challenging local authorities to meet the Decent Homes Standard in public housing by 2010; and to help 70% of vulnerable home-owners in the private sector have a decent home by 2010. As a result of the ballot in December tenants chose to stay with the Council as their landlord rather than transfer over to Weyfold Homes and Waverley faces a huge task in trying to meet Decent Homes by 2010..

· Sustainability, protecting and enhancing the environment are key issues for the future as we try to be good stewards of the earth’s resources and leave a planet in good heart for our grandchildren and future generations.

· Supporting the development of more affordable housing is one of our priorities both corporately and for the Housing Service. Because of high property values in this area, the aspiration of many to be homeowners is unachievable. Our highest priority, therefore is affordable homes for rent and then shared-ownership.

· In line with the Health White Paper published in February 2006 we intend to pursue our corporate objective of improving the quality of life of our residents by supporting partner agencies; such as health and social services, as they work to promote independence and the opportunity for people to continue to live in their own homes in our communities. Waverley also supports this area of work through providing Meals On Wheels, Community Transport, Day Centre activities and disabled adaptations.

All this, and more, is considered by this Strategy, as we try to balance the needs of people who need a home; those whose homes need improving and people who need the services we provide.

Housing remains a high priority for the Council as we “Work to ensure a decent home for all in Waverley”.
Kenneth T Reed



Housing Portfolio-Holder
Waverley Borough Council
November 2005


2. Executive Summary

Waverley Borough Council’s aim is Working to ensure a decent home for all in Waverley.

Waverley is an area of high house prices with first time buyer accommodation and affordable housing in very short supply. Thus the number one priority of this strategy is to facilitate the provision of good quality affordable housing.

Waverley is committed to ensuring all residents have a good quality home in which to live through working to meet the Decent Homes Standard, as well as improving energy efficiency.

The aims of the Strategy are wider than simply ‘bricks and mortar’, with commitments to enhance the local environment, improve community safety and protect the disadvantaged and vulnerable through better use of housing.

The priorities for the Strategy are:

1. Facilitating the provision of affordable housing

2. Meeting Decent Homes Standard for all Tenures

3 Sustainable Communities

4. Working with disadvantaged and vulnerable people

5. Continuing to reduce and prevent homelessness


More detailed information on these priorities and how the Council are going to achieve them can be found in Section 8 of this Strategy.

Waverley’s Housing Strategy is an action orientated plan with a clear vision and commitment to realising people’s aspirations to be housed. The document is divided in to thirteen sections:

Sections 1, 2 and 3 -Forward

These sections include the Foreword, Executive Summary and Introduction

Section 4 – Wider priorities and partnership working

This section describes the role of housing for Waverley in the context of other Council strategies and plans, as well as the wider regional, sub-regional and national context. This section also describes the Council’s approach to partnership working.

Section 5 – Supply and Demand

This section looks at the current local housing market, supply and demand for housing within the Borough, the profile of housing stock and its condition This section focuses on housing in both the public and private sectors and address the housing needs of a variety of groups.

Section 6 – Housing Stock Condition

This section will look at the condition of the housing stock in the Borough, both affordable and private sector housing. It also focuses on the Councils initiatives for improvements to housing as well as current performance.

Section 7 - Resources

This section looks at how resources are allocated to housing, identifies resources available for future investment and outlines the investment priorities for the lifetime of this strategy.

Sections 8, 9, 10 and 11 – Priorities Options and Action

This section focuses on our priorities for the future, discusses why these priorities were selected while others were discounted and sets out how the strategy will be monitored. The action plan sets out how these priorities will be achieved.

Section 12 and 13 Progress to Date and Appendices

The final section reflects on the Council’s achievements arising from the previous Housing Strategy. A glossary of terms can be found in Appendix 1.

3. Introduction

The Borough of Waverley covers an area of 345 square kilometres in southwest Surrey and is the largest district by geographic area in the county. The Borough is predominantly rural; three-quarters of the area is agricultural land and woodland, 61% is Green Belt and 80% is covered by environmental protection policies including the Surrey Hills Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Waverley is 35 miles from central London and is served by good strategic road and rail links, but has a predominantly rural road network and limited public transport.

Waverley has a population of 115,665 (2001 census), of whom three-quarters live in the Borough's four main settlements; Farnham, Godalming, Haslemere and Cranleigh. The proportion of young people (0-15 years) is 19% and is close to the regional and national averages. The district has 20% of the population above pension age, which is higher than the national figure of 18%. There is higher than average life expectancy in the district compared with regional and national averages. The population of Waverley is estimated to increase by at least 10,000 people by 2026.

The proportion of people from ethnic groups other than 'white British' is 2.6%; this compares with 8.7% for the South East and 13% for England. This is a significantly lower representation than the national average. Because of this relatively low level of ethnic groups in the Borough, the Council is conscious that the needs of these groups are not inadvertently overlooked.

Waverley is a prosperous borough. The local economy includes financial services, agriculture, some manufacturing and service industries, research, the professions and administration. 53% of residents are economically active. Unemployment at less than 1 % is well below the national average.

While many households in Waverley enjoy a comparatively high standard of living there are groups of residents who face considerable disadvantage. This includes individuals with particular needs living in rural areas, older people who find access to services difficult and, most notably, communities in semi-urban areas where there is an accumulation of needs and concerns, particularly relating to families with children and young people. Statistical evidence from, the census data showing the receipt of various benefits and the recent English Indices of Deprivation (2004) has identified areas within the wards of Farnham Upper Hale (Sandy Hill), Godalming Central and Ockford (Ockford, Ridge/Aaron’s Hill) and Godalming, Binscombe as having the most significant concerns. There are also a number of smaller pockets with a similar profile, for example the Chantrys (Farnham Castle).

Waverley is an area of high house prices with first time buyer accommodation and affordable housing in short supply.

4. Wider Priorities and Partnership Working

This section sets out the National, Regional and Local policy framework through which housing provision is influenced and is an important context for Waverley as it strives to secure additional affordable housing locally.

4.1 National Context

Sustainable Communities; Homes For All (2005)

This five year national plan sets out the Government’s housing strategy and contains targets for a number of key priorities which affect Waverley Borough Council. This includes housing supply, the planning system, social inclusion and achieving decent homes for all. The Plan established Regional Housing Boards, which decide how funding is distributed at a regional level. For more information, please go to http://www.odpm.gov.uk

The Housing Act 2004

Reforms arising from the Act include changes to the Right To Buy regime, which the Government believes will help to safeguard the supply of affordable housing in Waverley. The Act also provides the Council with additional tools to tackle anti-social behaviour. Other provisions included are the licensing of private landlords and Houses in Multiple Occupation and introduction of home information packs aimed at simplifying the buying and selling of property. More information about the Act can be found at http://www.hmso.gov.uk

The Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004

Officers in housing and planning work together very closely to facilitate the development of affordable housing. The Planning and Compulsory Purchase Act 2004 requires all local authorities to produce a Local Development Framework (LDF). The Act also replaces regional planning guidance with regional spatial strategies, involves the community at an early stage in the planning process and makes revisions to the appeals process. Further details of the Act can be found at http://www.legislation.hmso.gov.uk

Comprehensive Performance Assessment (CPA)

All Councils in the country are subject to Audit Commission CPA inspections in order to help councils improve services for their communities. CPA looks at how well the council delivers its services and considers how well the council is run. Waverley received a ‘good’ rating following an inspection of the Council in April 2004 The Council was also reported to have made good progress on the provision of affordable housing, which is a key issue facing all districts in Surrey. The full CPA report and further information about the CPA process is available from the Corporate Development Officer on (01483) 523148 or on our website at http://www.waverley.gov.uk

4.2 Regional Context

The Communities Plan - Sustainable Communities in the South East

Waverley understands the priorities contained within the Southeast version of the Communities Plan, which include initiatives to improve the supply of housing and make housing more affordable. House prices in Waverley are very high, which has resulted in many local people being unable to purchase a home in the Borough. Sustainable Communities in the South East aims to counteract this by building more homes, making better use of land and developing more cost effective building methods. A full copy of the plan can be downloaded from www.odpm.gov.uk

South East Regional Housing Strategy 2006-2008

With house prices and rents in the region beyond the reach of many people on average incomes, the South East Regional Housing Strategy sets out priorities for investment in the region and a framework for allocating resources. Waverley has contributed to the development of the Regional Housing Strategy through a range of forums at both officer and member level. We raised the need to increase the level of Housing Corporation subsidy towards rented accommodation, a locally prescribed definition of what constitutes a ‘Key Worker’ and demonstrating that the Borough is an area of high housing need, due to high income to house price ratios. Many of these issues fed back during the consultation period have been represented in the final regional strategy. The South East Regional Housing Strategy divides the South East region into 21 sub regional housing markets and Waverley is split between 2 regions. One is the Blackwater Valley sub-region, (which includes Farnham) and the Guildford and Woking sub-region, (which includes the remainder of Waverley).

The South East Regional Housing Strategy highlights 3 key areas of concern:

· The supply of affordable housing in the region.
· The general condition of housing stock in the region
· That vulnerable people are living in unfit or non-decent homes.

All of these issues are addressed at a local level within Waverley’s Housing Strategy.

Surrey Supporting People Strategy 2004-2009

People at risk of violence, young people and care leavers, people with multiple and complex needs, frail elderly people and people with learning difficulties are designated as being in priority need within Surrey. These priorities are largely replicated at Borough level.

Surrey-wide consultation also highlighted outstanding needs for floating support services for people with mental health issues, increasing demand for accommodation for ex-offenders; targeted provision for particular client groups (e.g. people with sensory impairments, physical disabilities, brain acquired injuries or people on the Autistic Spectrum). Homelessness and the needs of vulnerable homeless people cuts across many of these issues and client groups, with homelessness remaining a relatively small yet significant problem in Surrey.

The Surrey Supporting People Joint Management Board consists of representatives from the Eleven Borough and District Councils in Surrey, the Probation Service, Health and Adults and Community Care. Officers from Waverley Borough Council are represented on the Board. The work plan of this group has included the development of the Surrey Supporting People Strategy 2004-2009.

A full version of the Surrey Supporting People Strategy can be found at www.surreysp.org.uk or by contacting the Surrey Supporting Team Office Manager on (01372) 474699

South East Plan

The South East Plan will set out the vision for the region through to 2026 and, once approved, will become a legal document, which Local Authorities and other agencies will have to follow. The Plan will set out how the growing demands for homes, jobs and transport will be met and will set out strategies for improving the way people in the South East live and work. The draft plan includes policies on housing delivery; the location of housing; affordable housing; housing density and design; the type and size of new housing; and making best use of the existing housing stock. At this stage, however, it is still only a draft plan and this limits the amount of weight that can be attached to its strategy and policies.

The South East England Regional Assembly (SEERA) held a three month long consultation exercise on Part 1 of the plan, at the beginning of 2005.Waverley held a number of workshops with Town and Parish Councils, local organisations and Housing Associations/Registered Social Landlords. In addition, Waverley commissioned Surrey Social and Market Research to undertake a consultation with the Waverley Citizen’s Panel of over 1000 Waverley residents. Questionnaires were also circulated to over 500 organisations. The responses were collated and Waverley then sent a consultation response to SEERA in April 2005, which received strong cross-party support. Waverley’s response included a strong view that for cultural, historic, environmental and economic reasons, Farnham should not be included in the Western Corridor Blackwater Valley sub-region. This resulted in Farnham being excluded from this sub-region and, as such, Waverley would not receive housing allocations from the Western Corridor Blackwater Valley sub-region. Work is now underway on Part 2 of the Draft Plan (the Sub-regional details). The South East Plan will set out the district-level housing allocations for the period up to 2026. Consultation on this was o conducted on SEERA’s behalf, by Surrey County Council, and concluded in October 2005 In due course the SE Plan will replace the Surrey Structure Plan and will provide the strategic planning framework within which the LDF will operate.

For more information, please go to www.southeast-ra.gov.uk

4.3 Local Context

Waverley Corporate Plan 2005/06

The Corporate Plan was developed in response to the CPA inspection carried out in 2004, in order to set out the vision, aims and objectives for the Council and identify key priorities. The vision of Waverley Borough Council is to enhance the quality of life in Waverley, now and for the future, through strong local leadership and customer-focused service.

In order to achieve this vision, one of the aims of the Corporate Plan is to deliver good quality local housing.

Housing Targets set for 2005/06 include:
· To work with our partners to deliver affordable housing and identify new opportunities
· To update the Housing Needs Survey
· To promote affordable housing on the East Street development
· To enable 15 households to access home ownership through a Do It Yourself Shared Ownership Scheme (in partnership with Thames Valley Housing Association)
· Work with partners to promote and deliver 15 units of affordable housing for Key Workers (in partnership with Thames Valley Housing Association)

More information on the Corporate Plan can be found at http://www.waverley.gov.uk/documents/corporateplan.pdf or by contacting the Corporate Development Officer on (01483) 523 148.

Waverley Community Strategy

Waverley’s Local Strategic Partnership (LSP) comprises Guildford and Waverley Primary Care Trust, Surrey County Council, Surrey Police, Surrey Community Action, Waverley Business Forum and Waverley Borough Council, which are responsible for delivering the improvements identified in the Waverley Community Strategy.

Housing, and in particular affordable housing, is one of the key themes for the LSP because it is recognised that local services and the local economy are under pressure to retain and recruit staff and because of high house prices locally. The following housing priorities from the Community Strategy are also reflected in this housing strategy:

· Provide additional affordable homes to meet the needs of households who are on the housing needs register
· Provide affordable housing for people on low incomes whose jobs are essential to the economic and social well being of the Borough
· Secure housing with support for people who have special needs but who also need a home
· Address poor housing conditions in the private sector
· Achieve a level of repair set by Government called the Decent Homes Standard for all social housing and for vulnerable people in the private sector,

This Housing Strategy reflects the increasing importance of the Community Strategy and how its priorities reflect the needs and aspirations of the wide group of stakeholders represented by the LSP.

For further information on the Community Strategy please contact the Community Strategy Co-ordinator on (01483) 523 415.

Waverley Community Safety Strategy

The Council leads a Safer Waverley Partnership, which includes representatives from Guildford and Waverley Primary Care Trust, Surrey Police, Surrey Police Authority, Surrey Fire and Rescue Service, Surrey County Council, and Waverley Borough Council. The Safer Waverley Partnership carried out an audit of Crime in the Borough. From this the Community Safety Strategy for 2005-2008 was developed with the four strategic aims reduces crime; feel safe and be safe; tackle anti-social behaviour; and address substance misuse. For further information on the Community Safety Strategy visit www.waverley.co.uk or contact the Community Safety Officer on (01483) 523 386.

The Waverley Borough Local Plan 2002-2006

The Local Plan guides and controls the way in which land and buildings are used and developed. The underlying principle of the Local Plan is that the Council will seek to help maintain and improve the quality of life in Waverley, without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs and to enjoy a high quality environment. This means protecting and enhancing the Borough's environmental quality whilst providing for homes, jobs, infrastructure and services without undermining the value of built, natural and managed environmental resources.

Waverley is largely a rural Borough and much of the area is covered by the Metropolitan Greenbelt. Since the adoption of our Local Plan, the Surrey Structure Plan 2004 has been adopted. This sets out the district housing allocations for the period April 2001 to March 2016. In Waverley's case, the overall requirement is 2,810 dwellings over this period. Between April 2001 and February 2006, some 985 net new dwellings had been completed in Waverley, leaving a residual requirement of 1,825 dwellings to be completed between 2006 and 2016. It is anticipated that this requirement will be met by a combination outstanding planning permissions; sites where the Council has resolved to permit housing subject to a legal agreements; sites identified in the current Local Plan as being suitable for housing; and the continued supply of housing on windfall sites. It is not anticipated that there will be any need to identify new Greenfield sites in order to meet the current Structure Plan housing allocation for the Borough.

Evidence from the Housing Needs Register and Housing Needs Studies demonstrates a significant need for subsidised affordable housing in the Borough. The Council will continue to negotiate with developers and landowners to ensure a minimum of 25% to 30% (depending on densities) of net new dwellings, on eligible sites, are in the form of affordable housing. However it should be recognised that there are relatively few sites where this obligation is required and most housing sites in Waverley tend to be under 10 units, which is illustrated in table 4.3.2. As part of the development of the LDF affordable housing requirements are being revisited and one of the issues to be considered in the LDF is whether the affordable housing requirements should change to bring them more in line with the South East Plan and the Surrey Structure Plan.
Waverley has achieved significant success in recent years providing subsidised affordable housing. The table below provides a breakdown of homes delivered:

Table 4.3.1 Number of Affordable Dwellings and Rural Dwellings Delivered
YearNo. of Affordable dwellingsNo. of Rural dwellings
2002/03
33
9
2003/04
69
22
2004/05
89
11
2005/06
39
21

The table below demonstrates the provision of affordable homes against the number of properties built and the maximum possible under Section 106:

Table 4.3.2 Number of Dwellings Delivered through Section 106 Agreements
YearNo. of dwellingsNo. of Affordable dwellings through Section 106Max No. of Affordable dwellings possible
2002/03
221
29
63
2003/04
217
17 With regard to the ‘key site’ in Godalming, the Council agreed that the developer could provide 12 affordable homes off site or alternatively provide a commuted sum. It is hoped that a scheme of 12 affordable homes will start on site in 2006/07. 63 affordable units on s.106 sites granted planning permission.
65
2004/05
262
58
78
2005/06
121
28
36

For further information regarding the Local Plan, please see www.waverley.gov.uk or contact the Principal Planner on (01483) 523 297.

4.4 Waverley: Working in Partnership

This section provides some examples of how Waverley Borough Council works in partnership with other organisations and stakeholders in the development and provision of housing and support services.

Surrey Community Development Trust - Simmonds Court, Farnham

Simmonds Court provides accommodation for 13 single homeless people with support needs. This was developed with capital funding from Waverley, Rushmoor and Hart Councils, the Housing Corporation and revenue funding from the Surrey Supporting People team. First Base for the Homeless (a local voluntary organisation) has also provided significant financial input to this scheme.

The Economics of Social Housing (Knight Frank Study)

The 11 Surrey Local Authorities, jointly commissioned Knight Frank to undertake an assessment of the economics of affordable housing provision in the county.

Key recommendations included the creation of a countywide forum to establish standard Section 106 Agreements, ring fencing commuted sums to support future provision and continued liaison with the Housing Corporation and Regional Housing Board to provide clarity and certainty to developers.

A full version of the study can be downloaded from www.surreycc.gov.uk

Rural Housing Schemes

101 new homes in villages have been provided over the last 12 years and have been developed in partnership with Parish Council’s, the Rural Housing Trust, and Housing Associations. Villages where rural housing has been developed specifically for local people include Alfold, Bramley, Chiddingfold, Dunsfold, Ewhurst, Hambledon, Milford and Wormley. Currently Wyphurst Road in Cranleigh is being developed which is a major exception to planning policy.

Private Sector Landlords Forum

The Boroughs of Guildford, Waverley and Woking have jointly established a Private Sector Landlords Forum, which aims to provide advice, information and support to local landlords and letting agents. Recent meetings have discussed issues including Assured Shorthold Tenancies, Housing Act 2004, Houses in Multiple Occupation and Accreditation & Training. The Forum has helped build strong relationships with private landlords and the Council. Better access to the private rented sector has helped Waverley reduce homelessness and the use of temporary accommodation.

Blackwater Valley Housing Network

The Blackwater Valley Network was formed in 1996, and acts as a formal partnership between nine local authorities covering the area known as the Blackwater Valley.

Partners include Hampshire and Surrey County Councils, Bracknell Forest and Wokingham Unitary Councils and Guildford, Hart, Rushmoor, Surrey Heath and Waverley Districts. The area includes the larger towns of Aldershot, Camberley, Farnham, Farnborough and Fleet, together with several smaller settlements, including Ash, Ash Vale and Tongham in the Borough of Guildford. The partnership works together on issues including land use, environment, transport and the economy affecting the Blackwater Valley. It has a particular interest in the impact of major development such as the Aldershot Urban Extension.

Farnham Hospital

Following affordable housing negotiations on the Farnham Hospital site, the Council worked with its health service colleagues to secure 40% affordable housing. This 40% quota is 10% above the Government’s 30% target. In the spirit of the Local Strategic Partnership, the increased affordable homes element is to help address the needs of Key Workers. Half of the affordable homes allocation will be designated to Key Worker accommodation for health service staff in the first instance and the remainder will be nominated from the Council’s housing register.

Choice Based Lettings

The Council is currently working with the Guildford, Rushmoor Council and Hart Councils; to develop a choice based lettings system for Waverley. This partnership was successful in attracting a grant of £100,000 from the Department for Communities and Local Government to support this initiative. Waverley hopes to implement its choice based letting scheme in 2007

Housing and Planning

Housing staff provide colleagues in planning with a clear view on tenure mix and unit sizes required on all new applications in the context of local demand and supply before signposting developers to Registered Social Landlords. The Housing Department plays an active role in the development of the LDF and are working in close partnership with the Planning Department on the development of a Housing Development Plan Document. Other partnership work includes joint responses to formal consultation, monthly liaison meetings, weekly pre-application discussion meetings, and the organisation of a Housing and Planning Conference in March 2005.

Local Consultation

A copy of the draft Housing Strategy and feedback form has been available on the Council’s website, www.waverley.gov.uk with alternative formats available on request. Feedback has been received from Farnham Town Council in support of the priorities identified in this Strategy. The Council held a one day Housing Strategy Conference on 16 September 2005 to which stakeholders and partners were invited. The conference was attended by 40 delegates from agencies including local Banks, Parish and Town Councils representatives from Citizens Advice Bureaux, Housing Associations, Tenants’ Panel, Surrey County Council, and developers. As a result of the conference:

· It was agreed that the suggested priorities were indeed all key issues for Waverley
· Sustainability and working with disadvantaged people should begiven greater priority
· Homelessness moved down the priority list in the light of the Council’s achievements and ongoing work
· The Energy efficiency priority was absorbed by social, economic and environmental sustainabiliity priorities.

Waverley Borough Council is committed to meaningful consultation with residents, partners and other stakeholders. Waverley has a strong track record of proactive consultation on both a corporate level and a service level. The Council has consistently sought to engage the community on key issues and provide local people with the opportunity to influence important policy decisions. Traditional surveys have been used, as have more innovative techniques. Examples of ongoing consultation and listening to the community include:

· Facilitating a range of groups including the Registered Social Landlord Forum and the Multi-Agency Homelessness Steering Group in order to improve and develop joint working with our partner agencies
· Listening and responding to the concerns of our tenants and stakeholders through our Options Appraisal process
· Acting as a partner to the Community Incident Action Group to work towards making Waverley a safer place
· Jointly establishing and managing a Private Sector Forum in partnership with Guildford Borough Council and Woking Borough Council.
· Postal surveys on proposed capital and revenue expenditure
· Using market stalls and community bazaar’s to give and seek feedback on corporate and community strategies
· Introduction of Planning Forums in 2005
· Using ‘Planning for Real’ on major developments
· Involving tenants on re-modelling housing estates
· Supporting Councilors in ward events to identify key local issues as part of their community leadership role and the development of the Community Strategy
· The Citizens’ Panel, (which consists of 700 residents representing the community) offers consultation and feedback on policy matters, such as the Council’s cultural strategy, and service-related reviews which are used to challenge existing policy and practice as well as to test new ideas.
· Making good use of its Tenant Panels, the Waverley Business Forum, and regular meetings with the Town and Parish Councils to comment on and shape how services are delivered
· The LA21 strategy and the Replacement Local Plan involved a significant level of consultation that was tailored according to the groups being consulted (i.e. the timing and nature of the consultation was appropriate to the community or business groups including evening and weekends where needed).
· Co-ordinating public sector consultation exercises through the LSP

Local Best Value Reviews

Best Value reviews of housing services were undertaken between April 2001 and February 2002. In order to carry improvements forward, the Housing Department has established six Performance Improvement Groups to cover key areas of the service. These are:

· Voids and Lettings
· Rent Collection and Arrears
· Allocations, Tenancy Management and Supporting People
· Environmental Works and Estate Management
· Resident Participation and Customer Care
· Repairs and Maintenance.

Key achievements include:

· The production of a Tenants’ Handbook in partnership with the Tenants’ Panel, which was distributed in February 2003
· The achievement of Level 1 of the Equality Standard for Local Government 2004/05
· As part of our e-Government approach, repairs can be requested and council tax and rental payments can be made on line
· Fit for Purpose HRA Business Plan 2004
· Successful completion of the stock options appraisal before July 2004 deadline
· Consultation with tenants on a stock transfer proposal 2005
· The appointment of a Tenant Participation Officer in 2004
· The appointment of an Anti-Social Behaviour Officer in 2005
· The production of a suite of housing advice leaflets in 2004/05
· The production of a regular newsletter for applicants
· A departmental complaints handling procedure was implemented in July 2002.

Service Plans

The Housing Needs, Strategic and Enabling Services each produce yearly service plans (see appendix 5) which demonstrate how the priorities outlined in the corporate plan will be achieved. Since the 2005/06-service plan for housing needs has been in force, Housing Needs have made the following achievements:

· A significant reduction in number of homeless applications and homeless acceptances compared with same period last year. This has been achieved by effective proactive housing advice and helping people access the private rented sector through the use of cash deposit or rent bond schemes.
· A reduction of the number of households in temporary accommodation, from 85 to 53 households. Recent changes to the Council’s allocation policy, including an amendment giving additional priority to those who are living in temporary accommodation are helping achieve this reduction.
· Successful outcome to a partnership bid with Guildford, Rushmoor and Hart Council's for additional Government funding of £100,000 to help introduce Choice Based Lettings.
· Continuing to meet the Government's B&B target even though a large unit of temporary accommodation is undergoing major refurbishment
· Amendments to Council's Allocation Policy and Points scheme has recently been implemented. During 2005/06, Housing Enabling have made the following achievements against service plan targets:

· Completion of eleven shared ownership homes at Haslemere in partnership with Thames Valley Housing Association
· Completion of three homes for shared ownership and four rented homes at Hindhead, in partnership with Thames Valley Housing Association
· Completion of twelve homes for shared ownership for keyworkers and 9 rented homes at Wormley, in partnership with Sentinel Housing Group.
· Twelve households assisted into home ownership using Waverley Borough Council’s Do It Yourself Shared Ownership scheme (DIYSO)
· Completion of six affordable homes, facilitated by the Homebuy loan scheme
· Seventeen Key Workers have been assisted to purchase a property within Waverley using Key Worker Living Initiative
· Completion and handover of the first phase of development at Cranleigh, in partnership with the Affinity Housing Group. The scheme is an exception to planning policy, which will provide seventy-nine affordable homes for local people and is due for completion in the summer of 2006
· Work at Elstead to provide five homes for shared ownership and thirteen rented homes has started on site, in partnership with Thames Valley Housing Association.
· Work at Farnham to provide 2 shared ownership homes for keyworkers and five general needs rented homes has started on site, in partnership with Pavilion Housing Group.
· Work at Godalming to provide 5 shared ownership homes and 3 rented homes has started on site, in partnership with Mount Green Housing Association.
· Future development of affordable housing will include some of the eighty eight affordable units which already have planning permission and one hundred and sixty nine homes which are at an early discussion stage.

As a ‘Good’ Authority Waverley is not required to have a separate Best Value performance plan. For more information about Best Value and Service Plans please contact the Corporate Development Officer on (01483) 523 148.

5. Housing Demand

This section focuses on the supply of and demand for housing in the borough, both in the public and private sector. An analysis of the housing needs of groups of people who also have support needs follows.

As mentioned in the Introduction, not only is the population of Waverley due to increase over the lifetime of this plan it is also ageing. Conversely, the number of young people and the economically active age group are expected to decline over the life cycle of this plan.

In 2001, 3,762 householders told us about their current home, their future needs and the needs of those living with them as part of the 2001 Housing Needs Survey. A detailed questionnaire was sent out to 9,500 homes, across all tenures, in the Borough. This survey was updated in 2005. As part of the Corporate Plan, a full Housing Needs Survey is planned for 2006.

In addition to the information that residents provided, we also took account of population growth; data from the Housing Needs Register on the flow of social housing stock and need; 2001 census data, household and population projections and information on local housing markets.

5.1 Affordable Housing Demand

The 2001 Housing Needs Survey calculated the annual shortfall of affordable homes was 590 units per year. By the time an update was carried out in 2005, the annual shortfall of affordable homes had risen to 622 units per year. This figure represents the number of affordable new homes which would be needed each year to clear the backlog of those already in need and for those new households that are forming year on year, with the majority of homes being required for rent. Details of how these figures are calculated can be found in Appendix Five.

Waiting List applications have been steadily increasing over the past five years. In 2001/02, there were 1120 general needs applicants on the register. By the end 2005/06 this had risen to 1,651 general needs applicants (see Appendix Two). Changes in legislation that has given people living outside of Waverley a right to apply for housing has certainly contributed to this increase. However, the number of households accepted as homeless has been falling over the same period. In 2001/02, 148 households were accepted as homeless; during 2005/06, 53 households were accepted as homeless, as illustrated in Figure 5.1.1.This is, in part due to homeless prevention initiatives, such as increased levels of housing advice and assisting people to access other private accommodation through programmes such as the Rent Deposit Guarantee Scheme. Families with children and families expecting children represent 82% of homeless households on the Council’s Housing Needs Register (taken from an average over 5 years between 2002 and 2006).


Figure 5.1.1 Applicants on the Housing Register

The table below (5.1.2) shows the number of applicants currently living within Waverley who are on the Council’s Housing Needs Register. These figures include general needs, council transfer, homeless and housing association transfer applicants by the area they currently live and the number of bedrooms required.The table shows a high demand for one-bedroom properties in the borough. Closer analysis of this data shows that a significant proportion of the applicants are elderly who are specifically interested in being re-housed in designated elderly accommodation. In addition the Councils allocation policy only permits childless couples expectant mothers and couples with children under 6 months to register for 1 bed roomed accommodation. With this policy it is clear that a number of people rehoused in one bedroom accommodation will require larger accommodation in time .It is also worth noting that a significant proportion of applicants for a one bedroom home, who are in priority need require some form of support services or assistance to maintain their independence.
A clear demand is also shown for homes with two and three bedrooms, throughout the borough. In comparison, the demand for homes with four bedrooms is relatively low. However, further analysis suggests a significant number of households requiring a four bedroom home have submitted an application for a smaller property due to the limited numbers of homes with four bedrooms. Of the 5,100 homes owned by the Council, only 44 have four bedrooms.

Table 5.1.2 clearly demonstrates that whilst there is strong demand for housing in the more urban areas of Farnham, Godalming, Cranleigh and Haslemere, there is also significant demand for housing in rural areas

Table 5.1.2 Applicants on the Council’s Housing Needs Register by area and number of bedrooms at 1st April 2006
Area Property required1 bed2 bed3 bed4 bed
Alford
7
2
0
0
Bramley
11
9
4
0
Chiddingfold
15
10
6
0
Churt
7
0
0
0
Cranleigh
139
63
31
0
Dunsfold
5
3
1
0
Elstead
30
7
8
0
Ewhurst
24
10
4
0
Farncombe
112
63
32
0
Farnham
320
159
79
1
Frensham
1
1
0
0
Godalming
166
63
42
2
Haslemere
101
67
21
2
Hindhead
29
10
2
0
Milford
54
31
11
1
Shamley Green
3
2
0
0
Thursley
8
2
0
0
Tilford
6
3
2
1
Witley
30
9
6
1
Wonersh
2
4
0
0
Wormley
3
3
3
0
Wrecclesham
4
2
0
0
TOTAL
1077
523
252
8

5.2 Affordable Housing Demand from Concealed Households

The 2001 Housing Needs Survey identified 1,600 ‘concealed’ households, which are defined as households living with friends or relatives who are currently unable to access the market, but will be moving in the next five years. The 2005 Survey update identified 2,805 concealed households requiring accommodation over the next 5 years. Figure 5.2.1 illustrates that34.5% of concealed households indicated their preference for Council rented accommodation, 9.4% housing association rented homes and 7.3% homes for shared ownership and 39% for owner occupation. Despite a large number of concealed households expressing a preference for Council rented accommodation only 17% of the concealed households are registered on the Council list- raising the question as to why they have not bothered to register. In addition while 39% of concealed households expressed a wish to own their own home according to the Housing Needs Survey only 10% of concealed households have sufficient income to do so clearly demonstrating an affordability gap.


5.2.1 Tenure preferences of concealed households

The 2001 Housing Needs Survey also explored the property type and tenure required by concealed households, with most concealed households requiring one or two bed semi detached homes, flats or maisonettes (see table 5.2.2). These findings demonstrated a need for the provision of smaller units of affordable housing for households entering the housing market for the first time.

Table 5.2.2 Housing requirements of concealed households by Property Type

Type
1 bed
2 bed
3 bed
4 bed
Semi detached
46
207
56
0
Flat/maisonette
610
392
0
0
Bedsit
42
0
0
0
Terraced
2
166
0
5
Detached
0
3
6
0
Bungalow
0
11
0
0

Most concealed households in the survey responded that they require accommodation anywhere in the borough, although a significant proportion required housing in Godalming, Cranleigh or to remain in the village where they currently live. A full breakdown in supplied in Appendix 2.

5.3 Private Sector Demand

As has been previously mentioned, the demand for houses has increased the price of accommodation to levels that makes owner-occupation unaffordable for most newly forming households in Waverley. There is a relatively small private rented sector in the Borough, (8% of households) and a large proportion of this market is aimed at the executive luxury end of the market , which contributes to high rents.

The 2001 Housing Needs Survey found that there was high demand for rented property in the Borough, especially highlighted was the inadequate supply of two and three bedroom properties. However, demand for private rented accommodation amongst concealed households was low (10%) Of those concealed households seeking a one bedroom flat, only 27% could afford the average rent in the private sector and no concealed households could afford the rent for a 2 bedroom flat. It can therefore be concluded that the private rented sector makes very little contribution to the provision of affordable housing in the borough. This sector is not in the main accessible to lower income households unless assistance is received (i.e. rent deposit scheme) or they contribute a very high level of their disposable income.

5.4 Housing for People with Support Needs

In order to work towards meeting the needs of people with housing and support needs, Waverley Borough Council has undertaken a mapping exercise to identify supply and demand, in order to prioritise action required. This is summarised in the following table.

Table 5.3.1 Need, supply and action toward providing services for people in housing need who also have support needs

CLIENT GROUPNEEDSUPPLYACTION
Young people and care leaversNeed identified for more supported accommodation and improved continuity of services for vulnerable 16/17 year olds· Supported housing project for young people opened 2005 in partnership with Guildford Council and Stonham Housing Association· Work in progress to agree 16/17yr old and care leavers protocol
People suffering domestic abuseThere is currently no refuge or alternative accommodation for those experiencing domestic violence situated within the Borough· 2nd Domestic Violence Outreach worker in post November 2004

· Sanctuary pilot scheme developed

· Waverley supported creation of refuge in nearby area
· Waverley Borough Council safe house opened early 2006
· Review need for specialist domestic violence accommodation further to Sanctuary pilot scheme
People who misuse drug or alcoholResearch to be undertaken into the housing and support needs of this client group· Surrey Community Development Trust manage 14 bed ‘dry’ scheme

· Waverley refers clients to LINKS Housing Support

· Co-ordinator appointed by Surrey Drug Alcohol Action Team to undertake research
· Work with action team to identify needs of this client group
    · Undertake needs mapping exercise with support providers to consider needs for development of future services

    People with a learning difficultyNeed to work with partners to identify the range and amount of housing and support services required by people with learning difficulties and address issues identified in ‘Housing and Support Strategy for People with a Learning Difficulty in Surrey’ (2003). .· Waverley has 78 units in the Borough

    · Conference for users and carers held September 2005 in partnership with Guildford Borough Council and Surrey

    · People living in the community supported by Leonard Cheshire floating support service

    · Waverley tenants with learning difficulties supported by Waverley Borough Council Community Supporting People Service
    · Review housing needs once the outcome of research by the Adults & Community Care Team is completed.
      · Ongoing work with supported housing partners to identify suitable properties and sites for provision of move on accommodation

      · 1 RSL Sheltered Housing Provider considering using sheltered scheme for people with learning difficulties.
      People with mental health issuesMore joined up working required with other stakeholders to ensure consistent approach. Further investigation into the needs of people with mental health issues required.· 50 units provided by Housing Associations.
        · Floating support service for Waverley Borough Council tenants and homeless people provided through the Mental Health Supporting People Service.
        · Surrey wide bid for 4 full time workers to prevent homelessness
          · Undertake needs mapping exercise with support providers to consider needs for development of future services
          Teenage parentsNo lone parents under 18 occupying supported housing in Waverley between 2004-05· Nomination rights to supported housing scheme for young single mothers and babies, with support provided by Pilgrim Housing Association
            · Support for young parents in a couple can be provided through Waverley Borough Council Supporting People Service for Council tenants
            · Work in progress to agree 16/17yr old and care leavers protocol
              · Ongoing work with Surrey Teenage Pregnancy Co-ordinator

              · Mapping required to establish level of need from young couples who are parents

              Vulnerable homeless peopleMore specialist accommodation required for single homeless

              Need for more floating support services locally
              · Development of accommodation for 13 single homeless people with support needs in partnership with Rushmoor and Hart Councils.
                · Management and co-ordination of Winter Watch Project to provide temporary night shelter accommodation for single hhomeless people
                · Currently looking for an alternative location to provide year round night shelter which could cater for a wide variety of client groups depending on the level of support
                  · Surrey wide bid for 4 full time support workers to prevent homelessness
                  People with a physical disabilityMore research required into the needs of this client group· 7 units of accommodation provided for clients with severe epilepsy and other learning and physical disabilities

                  · New RSL developments have built in tailor made provision for specific households with access needs
                  · Review Disabled Operations Service to fast tract minor adaptations to improve quality of life
                    · Review Disabled Facilities Grant procedures in light of Surrey Disabled Facilities Grant project

                    · Undertake needs mapping exercise with support providers to consider needs for development of future services
                    Older People with support needsGrowing demand for additional extra care sheltered housing
                    With an over supply of traditional sheltered housing in the Borough.
                    · Pilot project for enhanced care in 2 council fully sheltered schemes in Farnham
                      · Careline alarm service for private sector, community Supporting People service for older council tenants
                      · Evaluate extra care pilot project and consider rolling it out throughout Borough.
                        · Council carrying out a review of sheltered and county Supporting People services as a result of Supporting People service review
                        5.5 Key Workers

                        It is generally acknowledged that Key Workers in Waverley and people who are key to public service or the local economy are experiencing increasing difficulties in obtaining a home of their own. Key Worker housing need was evidenced by the update to the Housing Needs Survey carried in 2005, which demonstrated that a household income of £30,000 is required in order to afford even the cheapest property in Waverley.

                        The Government has introduced the Key Worker Living (KWL) Initiative, for health workers, teachers, police and a small number of social workers to try and address some of these difficulties. 23 Key Workers who work in Waverley were assisted through the KWL scheme during 2004/05, for which Thames Valley Housing Association act as zone agents. There are currently a number of developments that will go a significant way towards meeting Key Worker Housing Need, including homes at Farnham, Wormley and Cranleigh.

                        The current definition of keyworker is restrictive and it has become apparent that there are a number of other vital workers who are not eligible to access the Key Worker Living Initiative. A local definition of Essential Workers has therefore been adopted, which includes “person or persons who live or are employed in the Borough of Waverley who provide essential services which are beneficial to the community, for example health, education, care, rescue or police or other local services as agreed by the Director of Housing of the Council.” Waverley Borough Council has supported a scheme, which embraces this wider definition and aims to assist 15 Essential Workers during 2005/06.

                        5.6 Black & Minority Ethnic Needs

                        According to Census data, 2.61% of the Waverley population do not consider themselves to be White British. The Council has systems in place to monitor applications from and lettings to BME applicants. According to the figure returned for 2004/05 4.9% of applications came from households who considered themselves to be BME, with 3.5% of lettings being made to BME households.

                        The Council offers a face-to-face interview with an interpreter and over the phone translation services for housing customers through the Language Line. Customers can also request written information to be translated into a range of community languages.

                        In terms of customer satisfaction, Waverley completes the statutory STATUS tenant satisfaction survey on a three yearly basis. This shows that satisfaction with the overall landlord service is very similar for BME and non-BME tenants, and satisfaction with opportunities for involvement in the service is higher among the BME tenants. In addition we carry out individual satisfaction surveys for service areas, including the repairs service, complaints handling, and new tenants, which record ethnicity. These show no disparities with the levels of satisfaction between different groups. However it is important to be cautious with regards to these figures as the numbers of responses are very small and it would be wrong to be complacent. As part of the next Housing Needs Survey further work is to be undertaken to investigate the housing needs of BME groups within Waverley.

                        At a corporate level the housing department has a representative who works with the Council- wide Equal Opportunities group. The group is working on improving the monitoring of BME service users, developing an updated race equality scheme for the council, and implementing race equality impact assessments for new policies. In addition the Council has achieved Level 1 of the Equality Standard for Local Government, and a 40% score for its race equality scheme at the end of 2004.

                        5.7 Older People

                        At the time the 2001 Census figures were collected, 10,479 people in Waverley were over the age of 75. It is predicted that southwest Surrey will see the largest rise in the county of the number of people aged over 85 years, by 2010. These trends have implications for policy and provision, as greater demands will be placed upon housing, health and support services. On a countywide basis, the Surrey Supporting People strategy has identified Extra Care schemes as a priority, particularly services for frail elderly people and persons with dementia. A report carried out by Laing and Buisson in 2004 estimated an extra 278 extra care units will be required in Waverley by 2010. The development of extra care housing is highlighted as a priority at national, county and local level within the Extra Care Sheltered Housing Strategy for South West Surrey. This is a multi agency document, which has been developed by Guildford Borough Council, Waverley Borough Council, Surrey Council and Guildford and Waverley Primary Care Trust.

                        Due to the large geographical spread of Waverley, sheltered housing with enhanced care needs to be strategically delivered to ensure there is a service available locally to older people. The Council carried out a mapping exercise into the demands placed on housing stock held in the Borough. This revealed an oversupply of ordinary sheltered housing in the area. Subsequently, two existing sheltered schemes have been re-designated as Extra Care facilities. Two hard to let sheltered schemes have been decommissioned in order to achieve a balance of general needs and sheltered housing which is more closely matched to needs.

                        The Council supports older people to live independently in their own homes through schemes including Care and Repair, the Care Line service that supports over 1,000 people in the private sector, and the provision of Meals-On-Wheels. The Council also provides a Community Supporting People service to over 900 older and vulnerable tenants to enable them to remain in their own homes, through initiatives including Telecare, sensors and alarms. A pilot project established in April 2005 and managed in partnership between Waverley Borough Council and the Surrey’s Adults and Community Care Team provides enhanced care in two sheltered schemes, which meet the needs of frail elderly people.

                        5.8 Gypsies and Travellers

                        Waverley currently has around 280 travellers living on 9 gypsy sites and 2 showman sites in the Borough. Another site with four plots is being promoted and will be considered by the Council in due course. In line with requirements placed upon emerging LDFs and contained within the Housing Act 2004, work is presently underway to speak to all gypsy and traveller families in the Borough, to discuss their changing needs, in terms of family household composition altering over time. A mapping exercise will then take place to assess the capacity of existing and potential sites to meet these expressed needs. At a Surrey wide level, Waverley officers are involved in carrying out a county wide assessment of Travellers' housing needs; to identify how many residential, transit and temporary stopping places are needed, where they are needed and how big they will need to be. It is hoped that funding will be secured at county level, with a specific post designated to co-ordinate this work and take forward the recommendations made in the ‘Strategic Assessment of Travellers needs in Surrey’ (2004).

                        5.9 Lone Parents

                        According to the 2001 Census the percentage of lone parent households with dependant children in Waverley is 3.7%. This has almost doubled since the previous Census of 1991 but still remains well below the national average for England and Wales of 6.5%. Of the 1,738 lone parent families most single parents are women (1,551) but a small number (178) are men. Reasons for the increase include demographic changes such as increased divorce and separation rates. Currently 305 single parent families are registered on the Councils housing register and this represents 13% of households on the register.

                        Nearly half of clients using our Domestic Violence Outreach Service are single parents. Of the 7 households re-housed during 2004-5 following domestic violence, 3 are single parent families. The Housing Service offers home visits to people who may find it difficult to come into the council offices and appointments throughout the day to assist people who may need to make alternative childcare arrangements. A Tenancy Support Officer provides extra advice and information to residents who may need added assistance. As an employer, Waverley Borough Council offers flexible working conditions and assistance with childcare costs in order to help staff with childcare arrangements.

                        5.10 Disabled Facilities Grant (DFG)

                        A mandatory DFG is available to home-owners and tenants to cover the cost of any works required to meet the needs of a disabled person. The eligible works are listed under Section 23 of the Housing Grants, Construction and Regeneration Act 1996 and includes works to provide access to and from the dwelling, to the principal family room, bedroom, bathroom, w.c. and kitchen and to assist in the use of facilities s by the disabled person. The maximum cost of works under the grant is £25,000.00 and the grants are means tested. Discretionary grants (e.g. to provide facilities for employment at home) are no longer available.

                        There has been an increase in demand for Disabled Facilities Grants despite the fact that discretionary works are no longer eligible. In 2003/04 33 Disabled Facilities Grants were completed with a spend of £219,000. In 2004/05 these figures rose to 42 grants at £300,000. According to latest figures, 22% of Waverley residents are over 60 and 9% are over 75 – which is the highest proportions in Surrey. A significant proportion of these people are or will soon become disabled. In recognition of this clear increase in need, the Council has increased the DFG budget for 2005/06 and 2006/07 by £100,000 to £325,000 and to £400,000 in 2008/9.

                        6. HOUSING SUPPLY

                        6.1 The Local Housing Market

                        House prices in Waverley are currently significantly above the average for the South East region as a whole. For example, according to land registry figures the average cost of a terraced house in the South East is £174,710, whereas a terraced house is Waverley is £207,258. House prices have risen across all properties types since 2000 by an average of 37%. The income required to purchase an averagely priced flat in Waverley is £37,000. According to the 2005 Housing Needs Survey Update, more than 75% of existing households in Waverley have an income below this level.

                        Access to the market is clearly dependent on availability. This factor is particularly critical for low-income households who can only enter the market where there is an adequate supply of affordable homes. Although the average price of flats/maisonettes is £201,127(according to the Land Registry), entry-level sales vary across the Borough with lowest prices for a one bedroom flat starting at around £97,213 in Haslemere, rising to £139,950 in Waverley Central.

                        Findings from the Housing Needs Survey Update 2005 indicate that over 90% of concealed households have an income of less than £30,000 per annum. As a result, the vast majority of concealed households are unable to afford to purchase a property on the open market. Private rented accommodation was not a popular choice amongst concealed households and high rent levels mean that only less than half of those who expressed a preference for private rented accommodation could actually afford it.

                        On average, there are 2,604 private house sales each year. 2004/05 saw slightly fewer sales, which probably reflects the general slow down in the housing market nationwide. The Council has a housing stock of just over 5,100 properties and for the last 2 years, the Council has had just over 300 new lettings each year. According to the Housing Strategy Statistical Appendix 2004/5, other social housing providers (such as Registered Social Landlords) have a further 1,476 properties within the Borough, around 100 of which become vacant each year. In the private rented sector anecdotal evidence suggests that in the region of 1,200 homes become available each year, encompassing a range of property types. Highest demand is reported to be for 2 bedroom properties.

                        6.2 Profile of the Housing Stock

                        The housing stock across the borough comprises 48,500 homes of which, 42% are detached, 26% semi-detached, 14% terraced, and 15% flats/maisonettes. There are fewer smaller homes, terraced homes and flats, than the national average. The majority of homes are post war, with 46% built between 1945- 1980 and 11% built after 1980, with 12% built before 1900, 7% built between 1900- 1914, and the remaining 23% between 1918- 1939.

                        Owner occupation is the dominant tenure, with a higher proportion of the Waverley population owning their own home, in comparison to the English average. Of the Borough’s total housing 76.46% is owner occupied, of which only 0.73% is in shared ownership. Homes rented from the Council make up 10.15% of the overall stock. Homes managed by Registered Social Landlords account for a further 2.87%. 8.13% of respondents to the 2001 census stated that they were living in privately rented homes. It should be noted that 2.38% of people stated that they were living rent-free. The table below illustrates that owner occupation in the district is around 7% above the average for England and both the rented sectors are slightly below the national average. A full breakdown is contained in Appendix Two.


                        Figure 6.2.1 Tenure of households Waverley and England


                        Small households are predominant in the Borough, with 67% of homes containing one or two people. The most common household types are couples with no children living with them (27%), pensioners (26%) and single person households (13%).

                        13% of households are economically retired and 12% are in receipt of some form of means tested benefit. 14% have an annual income under £11,900.

                        6.3 Affordable Housing Supply

                        The number of homes owned by the Council is reducing as a result of the Right to Buy scheme. The Council’s housing stock has reduced from 8,000 homes in 1980; to 5,100 homes in 2005. The table below shows the profile of the total Council general needs and RSL stock in the Borough, by area and number of bedrooms.

                        Table 6.3.1 General Needs Council Stock and RSL Affordable Housing by Parish as at 1.4.06

                        Area
                        1 bed
                        2 bed
                        3 bed
                        4 bed
                        RSL stock
                        Alfold
                        6
                        5
                        14
                        0
                        24
                        Bramley
                        39
                        29
                        57
                        4
                        6
                        Chiddingfold
                        18
                        29
                        44
                        0
                        4
                        Cranleigh
                        124
                        89
                        122
                        0
                        104
                        Dockenfield
                        0
                        2
                        13
                        0
                        0
                        Dunsfold
                        0
                        2
                        12
                        0
                        20
                        Elstead
                        22
                        19
                        51
                        1
                        35
                        Ewhurst
                        10
                        18
                        12
                        2
                        5
                        Farnham
                        192
                        369
                        474
                        19
                        767
                        Fernhurst
                        0
                        0
                        9
                        0
                        0
                        Frensham
                        4
                        9
                        35
                        0
                        0
                        Godalming
                        180
                        346
                        337
                        3
                        284
                        Hambledon
                        13
                        5
                        4
                        0
                        5
                        Hascombe
                        6
                        5
                        4
                        0
                        0
                        Haslemere
                        109
                        193
                        243
                        9
                        137
                        Shalford
                        0
                        0
                        2
                        0
                        0
                        Thursley
                        4
                        3
                        5
                        0
                        0
                        Tilford
                        1
                        3
                        1
                        0
                        8
                        Witley
                        121
                        118
                        117
                        0
                        77
                        Wonersh
                        24
                        29
                        27
                        6
                        0
                        Total
                        873
                        1273
                        1583
                        44
                        1476

                        Lettings between 2001 and 2006 continue to demonstrate a shortfall between affordable housing supply and demand. Over the last four years there has been an average of 310 new tenancies per annum. Registered Social Landlords (RSLs) operating within the Borough let an average of 94 properties per annum over the same period, of which around 40% were nominations received from the Council.



                        Figure 6.3.2 Lettings of Waverley Council Homes between 2001 and 2006

                        The issue of availability is the key to the need for larger accommodation. In 2005/6, 57% of all vacancies that arose in Waverley’s housing stock were one-bedroom properties; either from the general needs stock, housing designated for people over 50 or within sheltered accommodation. A quarter of Waverley Council Housing Stock is designated for people aged over 50, even though, people over 50 only make up 20% of applicants on the housing register (as at 01.04.06). Vacancies also arise more frequently in over 50’s accommodation, with 21% of Waverley homes lettings in 2005/6 being made to applicants aged over 50. As of 01.04.06, 28% of the waiting list applicants need 2 bedroom properties although during 2004/5 only 23% of lettings to Waverley homes were to general needs properties with 2 bedrooms. On average, waiting times for a one-bedroom property are shorter than waiting times for a two or three bedroom home in the borough. The Average wait for people housed in the last year was 17 months for a one bedroom property, more than 24 months for a two bedroom property and 34 months for a three bedroom property.

                        7 HOUSING STOCK CONDITION

                        This section will look at the condition of the housing stock in the Borough, for both affordable housing and private sector housing. It also focuses on the Council’s initiatives for improvements to housing as well as current Council performance.

                        A Private Sector Stock Condition Survey is currently planned to take place in 2006.

                        7.1 Decent Homes Investment Strategy

                        The stock of all public landlords is required to comply with the Government’s Decent Homes Standard by 2010.

                        In June 2003 the Council began a stock condition survey of all of its housing stock. As at April 2005, the Council had inspected the stock condition of 90% of the stock. From this information it has been established that 53% (2,757 dwellings) of Waverley owned homes are currently non-decent, 76% are potentially non-decent and if no work were undertaken by 2010, 90% of the stock would be non-Decent. The table below shows the number of homes that are or will be non-Decent by element of failure.

                        Table 7.1.1 Decent Homes Failures by element of failure

                        Decent Homes Criteria
                        Count (Dwellings)
                        Currently Non-DecentPotentially Non-DecentProperties failing if no work is undertaken by 2010
                        Thermal Comfort
                        12841284
                        Modern Facilities
                        6818141496
                        Disrepair: Key component
                        113137024833
                        Disrepair: Non-key component
                        213598811
                        Total *
                        3,3095,1148,424
                        % of total
                        53%76%90%

                        The total expenditure that needs to be spent over the next five years from April 2006 to bring 99% of Council homes in Waverley to Decency (as defined by the Governments Decent Homes criteria) by 2010 is £37million. The Council has also to ensure that it meets Statutory, Health and Safety Responsibilities estimated at £18 million over the next five years.

                        The stock condition survey clearly shows which homes fail the DHS and all that information is held on a spreadsheet with all the address and failures noted. A procedure is in place so that when the work has been completed on individual properties, the database is updated with progress to the target monitored on a monthly basis. The database is also configured to note when properties fall into non-decency allowing a continually updated record of the failures and rectifications to 2010 and beyond.

                        In order to meet the Decent Homes Standard for the stock, the Council decided in January 2005 to propose a transfer of its housing stock to a newly formed, locally based housing association. A tenants’ ballot conducted in December 2005 returned a vote of confidence of Waverley as a landlord as the majority of tenants chose to remain with the Council. Under the present structure of Waverley’s Housing Department and the services provided, the current estimates of available resources indicate that after doing health and safety and statutory work the Council will not meet the “Decent Homes” target by 2010. Consequently, the Director of Housing and his staff are examining how the Council can maximise assets and minimise liabilities. All services will be subject to review and any changes to service would be subject to full and proper consultation. This review will be completed by September 2006, after which the Council will decide the way forward. The Council owns 5,108 homes (at 31.03.05) and each year around 300 of these become vacant. Once any necessary repair works have been completed, these homes are let to a household on the Housing Needs Register and Transfer list. Around 15-20 of the dwellings vacated each year need extensive and expensive works to be carried out before they can be re-let. Dealing with structural problems, subsidence or complete renovation can result in costs well over £20,000 on a property before it can be rented out. In order to help save money, which can then be reinvested in tenants homes, the Council has decided that it will transfer up to 20 homes per year which require major expensive works. This would save the Council around £400,000 each year and this money can be spent on priority works in remaining Waverley Council dwellings. The 20 homes will be transferred to a housing association, which will be able to undertake all the works to bring the homes up to the Decent Homes Standard and even go beyond it. Once ready, the homes will be offered for rent to households who are on the Housing Needs Register and Transfer List. This course of action will assist the Council to avoid major expenditure whilst retaining these homes in the rented sector for people who need affordable homes.

                        Full details of the repairs and maintenance needs of the Council’s stock over the next 30 years and resources for funding can be found in Waverley’s Housing Revenue Account (HRA) Business Plan.

                        In July 2004, Waverley carried out a survey of all RSL’s in the Borough regarding their ability to meet the Decent Homes Standard. Generally, RSL’s report that they will not have difficulty meeting the Decent Homes Standard, particularly as most of their stock is relatively new. There are some properties, which do not meet the ‘thermal comfort’ requirements, but RSL’s are confident that they will achieve the required standard within the timescale. Achievement of the Decent Homes Standard for RSL stock will be monitored by Waverley Borough Council and the Housing Corporation.

                        Only one housing association in the Borough, has homes that are non-Decent. They estimate that just over 10% of their homes in Waverley are currently non-decent. Using an asset management program, they have the ability to program works to meet Decent Homes Standard. They anticipate meeting the requirements of Decent Homes Standard on all stock by 2010.

                        7.2 Private Sector Housing

                        A study, undertaken in 1995/96 found that 3% of properties within the private sector were statutorily unfit and a further 6% in serious disrepair. An additional 14% had problems with dampness and condensation. According to housing stock projections contained within a report prepared by the Building Research Establishment (BRE) in February 2005, 30% of the private sector stock is non-decent, failing any one of the four components, the majority of which (23%) were due to inadequate thermal comfort. The report also states that vulnerable people occupy 4% of dwellings that do not meet the Decent Homes Standard. Standard Assessment Process (SAP) ratings of less than 30 affect 7.5% of dwellings and fuel poverty affects 7% of occupiers.

                        The BRE Housing Stock Models, which were provided in March 2005, have provided information on:

                        · Non-Decent homes and its four components
                        · Non-Decent homes occupied by vulnerable groups
                        · Dwellings with a SAP less than 30
                        · Households in fuel poverty.

                        The Council believes the data provided to be informative and reliable. However we recognise the need for this data to be supplemented and to a certain extent validated by a survey of the condition of the private housing stock. We intend to use the model projections to design a sample for a house condition survey, which will focus on areas of interest and reduce standard error to a minimum. The survey will take place during 2006, in partnership with Guildford Borough Council

                        7.3 Houses in Multiple Occupation (HMOs)

                        The HMO surveys carried out in 1991 and 1992 estimated that there were approximately 250 HMOs in the Borough. 20% of these were self-contained flats, which were mainly in good condition and low risk. A further 26% were smaller shared houses. As a result of subsequent case law, it became unclear whether these smaller houses met the definition of an HMO or whether the occupants lived together as a single household. 33% of the HMOs in the Borough were considered to be higher risk bedsits or hostels. Since the surveys were completed the Council has maintained a database of HMOs. New properties have been added to the database following notifications from other departments or the public and properties have been removed following demolition or change of occupation, but overall there has been little change.

                        The Housing Act 2004 has introduced a new definition of HMOs, which includes the majority of shared houses but excludes most of the self-contained flats. It is estimated that this will reduce the number of HMOs in Waverley to approximately 200. The new legislation has also introduced a scheme of licensing of HMOs. Mandatory licensing is being introduced for the larger “higher risk” HMOs of 3 or more storeys and 5 or more people. There are estimated to be approximately 30 of these properties in Waverley. Additional licensing of other HMOs is available to local authorities where they consider that a significant number are being managed ineffectively and giving rise to problems to the occupants or members of the public. There are no plans to introduce additional licensing at this stage.

                        The Council is working to update the database to ensure that the list is current and the licensable HMOs are identified. A proactive inspection programme starting with the higher risk properties will follow this.

                        7.4 Vacant Homes

                        The number of empty homes across tenures is relatively low with only 1.7% of all dwellings in Waverley standing empty at any one time, compared to the national average of 3.4%. The reasons for properties being empty are generally those associated with prosperity (particularly second homes or ancillary accommodation on large country estates) rather than with deprivation (abandonment and serious disrepair).

                        However, there are a very small number of abandoned and derelict houses in Waverley, as well as empty flats, particularly over commercial premises, which could, potentially be put to residential use. Empty properties in rural boroughs can have a real impact upon the vitality of local communities. The number of households owning second homes across the country jumped 15% in 2003/4 compared to the previous year with an estimated 295,000 households in England owning a second home. Given the limits on opportunities for new development, any empty property in Waverley is the waste of a very scare resource.

                        As the enabling authority for Waverley, the Council has a role to use its power and influence to improve housing supply and housing conditions across all tenures. Bringing empty homes back into use is one of many contributions Local Authorities can make. In order to facilitate bringing empty properties back into use, Waverley Borough Council has developed a range of initiatives including:


                        · A yearly mail out in to over 300 owners of empty properties, offering support and advice to help bring their property back into use
                        · Developed a Rental Deposit Guarantee Scheme and Living Over the Shop Project
                        · Implemented a policy of charging owners 90% of Council Tax for their empty property
                        · Refurbished a 3-bed house in Farnham as part of a supported housing scheme for young people
                        · Redevelopment planned for East Street and Farnham Hospital, which currently includes a number of empty properties
                        · Lobbying NHS Estates, Department for Communities and Local Government and English Partnerships to use the empty properties at Milford Hospital
                        · Participated in a Surrey wide bid to support an RSL to bring empty properties back into use across the county
                        · Increase awareness and raise profile of Empty Homes issues in Waverley through range of mediums including leaflets, newsletters, press releases and posters
                        · Improved reporting mechanisms to record empty homes through a variety of forums, both internally and externally
                        · The Council has demolished a hard to let sheltered scheme and is currently consulting on what should be built on the site.

                        7.5 Private Sector Renewal

                        The introduction of the Regulatory Reform (Housing Assistance) Order 2002 brought the Renovation Grant Scheme to an end and empowered each local authority to introduce its own form of assistance. Waverley Borough Council therefore introduced a new policy targeted towards assisting the elderly, disabled and low-income households. The policy also takes into account the Home Energy Conservation Act (HECA) Strategy, Local Agenda 21, Crime and Disorder Strategy and Government Guidance on Housing Renewal. The intention of the Regulatory Reform Order was that the responsibility for maintaining privately owned property should rest first and foremost with the home-owner.

                        The Council adopted the new Home Improvement Policy on 4th February 2003. The main strands of the policy are as follows:

                        · Loan finance
                        · Home Improvement Grants
                        · Equity Sharing
                        · Advice and Information
                        · Care and Repair Agency.

                        More Details about the new Home Improvement Policy can be found in Appendix Seven.

                        7.6 Review of Policy

                        Spending on housing renewals during 2004/05 dropped considerably compared with previous years. In 2003/04, 42 renovation/home improvement grants were completed at a cost of £230,000. The following year, only 27 grants were completed at a cost of £112,000. At the same time there has been no take-up of equity release loans or the equity share scheme. There has been a marked resistance by homeowners in Waverley to giving up part of the equity of their properties in order to pay for repairs and improvements. With renovation grants no longer available, the only uptake of assistance has been for the Waverley Home Improvement Grant for works costing no more than £5,000.

                        In view of the low uptake of elements of the Home Improvement Policy and in recognition of the results of the BRE project and the target for the Decent Homes Standard in the private sector, Waverley Council intends to overhaul the Home Improvement Policy. It is hoped that the revised policy will commence in September 2006 and will focus on areas of highest need with a more accessible approach.

                        7.7 Performance in Key Service Areas

                        The Council monitors performance in key service areas such as allocations and repairs. The following tables demonstrate the Council’s performance over the last three years.


                        Allocations and Housing Register

                        2002/032003/042004/05
                        Average time taken from date void property is available for letting to new tenancy commencement date.
                        7 days
                        8 days
                        12 days
                        New tenancies granted as a % of all new tenancies to:


                        36%


                        36%


                        37%
                        (i) WBC and RSL transfer applicant
                        (ii) Housing Register general applicants
                        42%
                        46%
                        45%
                        (iii) Housing Register homeless applicants
                        18%
                        17%
                        17%
                        Percentage of all nominations to RSLs to homeless applicants
                        43%
                        40%
                        26%
                        The number of applicants registered on the;

                        1252

                        1436

                        1575
                        (i) Housing needs register.
                        (ii) Homelessness Register.
                        137
                        133
                        104
                        (iii) Transfer Register.
                        581
                        574
                        579

                        As part of the 2004/05 service plan for housing needs, the Council decided to revise the allocations policy and a new policy implemented from 2005.The Council is currently working to introduce a choice based lettings system in 2007.

                        Homelessness

                        2002/032003/042004/05
                        Average length of stay in;
                        Bed and Breakfast accommodation6 Weeks 6 Weeks 3 Weeks
                        Hostel accommodation of households which include dependent children or a pregnant woman and which are unintentionally homeless and in priority need44 Weeks54 Weeks31 Weeks
                        Proportion of homelessness applications which LA makes decision on and issues written notification to applicant within 33 days
                        67%
                        87%
                        98%



                        Strategy and Enabling

                        2002/032003/042004/05
                        Number of private sector dwellings that are returned into occupation or demolished during current year as a direct result of action by the LA
                        17
                        18
                        2
                        The total number of new housing units completed during the year through the enabling role
                        34
                        59
                        110
                        Number of new dwellings completed on Greenfield sites through the exceptions policy.
                        9
                        15
                        13
                        Number of completed affordable homes on private sector developments negotiated through the planning system
                        20
                        4
                        21
                        Number of people given assistance to purchase their own home through:


                        5


                        4


                        0
                        (i) DIYSO (Do It Yourself Shared Ownership)
                        (ii) Homebuy
                        8
                        6
                        1
                        (iii) SHI (Starter Homes Initiative)
                        26
                        35
                        2
                        (iv) Key Worker Living
                        n/a
                        n/a
                        18

                        Vacant Homes

                        2002/032003/042004/05
                        % of private sector homes that are empty as at end of previous financial year
                        3.20%
                        1.80%
                        1.38%
                        % of empty private sector homes that have been empty for more than 6 months as at end of previous financial year
                        0.65%
                        0.63%
                        0.97%

                        Energy Efficiency

                        2002/032003/042004/05
                        Average SAP rating of LA owned dwellings
                        61
                        61
                        66



                        8. RESOURCES

                        Housing is an expensive area of activity for the Council. The Council’s responsibilities include the management and maintenance of over 5,000 rented homes; dealing with homeless households; providing grant assistance to the private sector; enabling the development of more affordable homes; and support voluntary sector partners in housing-related activities, such as Housing Advice.

                        Being in an area that is perceived as being relatively ‘healthy and wealthy’, Waverley is not eligible for many of the national funding streams coming from central government and so we have to rely on generating resources more locally.

                        8.1 Sources of Capital income

                        Capital resources that come into the Borough are derived from a number of sources e.g. the Regional Housing Board/Housing Corporation (which provides grants to housing associations); commuted sums from new housing developments; sales of council homes under the Right-to-Buy; land disposals; and some grant funding from the government – which contributes towards Disabled Facilities Grants (DFGs). For many years, the Council has always taken the approach that capital receipts arising from housing should be reinvested in housing programmes.

                        Previously, a major source of income to the Council is Right To Buy Capital Receipts. The Council has always invested these receipts in housing in Waverley. However, the Local Government Act 2003 introduced a requirement for Local Authorities, like Waverley, to surrender 75% of these receipts to the Government for redistribution across the country. This reduces Waverley’s ability to achieve Government objectives e.g. meeting the Decent Homes Standard and enabling more affordable housing. Nevertheless the Council’s current policy is to invest 50% of the Right to Buy receipts it is allowed to keep in the Council’s own stock and 50% in the provision of grant aid to RSL’s to enable them to provide more affordable homes.

                        The rate of Right to Buy is currently slower than during the last two decades. In 2004/05, 35 properties were sold, generating a capital receipt of £3.9 million. During 2003/04, 81 homes were sold under the Right to Buy scheme, which generated a capital receipt of £8.29 million. This was higher than during 2002/03, when only 55 sales were completed and a £5 million capital receipt produced. The change was probably as a result of tenant concerns over a reduction in Right to Buy discounts. Our projections assume 18 sales per year by 2011/12.

                        The Council also utilises the Major Repairs Allowance fully on HRA Capital Funding of £3.5m per annum.

                        Section 106 Planning Agreements have taken on an increasingly important role in the delivery of affordable homes. In exceptional circumstances where development will not go towards meeting local need, policy H5 of the Waverley Borough Local Plan 2002 makes provision to allow a commuted sum to be offered which will support the development of affordable housing on an alternative site. In such cases, the applicant will be required to demonstrate why is has not been possible or desirable to provide the affordable housing on site. The applicant will also need to show that other options, such as cross-subsidy between rented and shared ownership units and providing the affordable housing on another site, have been considered and why they were discounted. Where it is appropriate to use commuted sums, this funding will be used to support the development of affordable housing on more suitable sites.

                        In some cases our partner Housing Associations have been able to bring their own resources to new housing schemes. As well as raising funds through borrowing, housing associations have also been able to part fund new homes using their own reserves, for example through Recycled Capital Grant Funds collected through tenants stair-casing up through Homebuy schemes.

                        Though, on the face of it, these funding streams appear to generate significant sums, the capital investment needed to meet our objectives simply outstrip the resources generated. However, in recent years available funding has reduced as a result of the abolition of the Local Authority Social Housing Grant (LASHG) system; and because the Government now takes 75% of all Right-to-Buy capital receipts from the Council to redistribute across the country.

                        A key priority locally is trying to meet the need for affordable homes. We also have an increasing role in private sector regeneration. An additional challenge the Government has given all councils that own housing stock target that they (along with other social landlords) should meet the Decent Homes Standard by 2010.

                        We therefore have to prioritise our expenditure carefully to try to balance competing housing demands.
                        Detailed information regarding the Council’s resources in its role as a landlord can be found in the HRA Business Plan.

                        The Council’s Stock Condition Survey at 2006 indicated that, to meet the Decent Homes Standard by 2010, the Council needs to spend £37m and £18m on Statutory, Health and Safety Works. The Council estimates that it has £27m.

                        8.2 Sources of Revenue Income

                        The Council’s greatest source of income for affordable homes comes through rent income from the 5,100 homes it owns. In 2006/07, it anticipates receiving in the order of £20,844,740. However, because of the way in which the ‘Housing subsidy’ scheme works nationally, Waverley will again receive a ‘negative subsidy’ – which means that the Council will have to pay money to the Government from its rental income. In 2006/07, this will be £8,660,000 (by way of comparison of the negative subsidy for 2005/06 was £8,082,000). For 2006/07, the Council increased tenants rents by the Government’s guideline figure of 5%, which generated an additional £658,000; however, because the negative subsidy figure increased by £578,000, the Council only generates a cash increase of £80,800 to spend on tenants’ homes. Were this subsidy system not in operation, the Council would be well able to meet the Decent Homes Standard.

                        8.3 Service Expenditure

                        As mentioned above, in addition to its current role as landlord, the Council has a strategic housing role within the wider community. As a strategic body it has responsibility for:

                        · Housing Advice
                        · Housing the Homeless
                        · Maintaining the Housing Needs register
                        · Private Sector renewal (by way of grants)
                        · Enabling Affordable Housing.

                        Council Tax from within the Council’s General Fund funds these services. The table below (7.2.1) illustrate what has been spent recently or what it is currently planned to spend on these strategic areas.

                        Table 8.3.1 General Fund Revenue Programme

                        2002/3
                        2003/4
                        2004/5
                        2005/6
                        2006/7
                        2007/8
                        2008/9
                        2009/10
                        ESTIMATED SPEND
                        ACTUAL SPEND
                        ESTIMATED SPEND
                        ACTUAL SPEND
                        ESTIMATED SPEND
                        ACTUAL SPEND
                        ESTIMATED SPEND
                        ESTIMATED SPENDESTIMATED SPENDESTIMATED SPENDESTIMATED SPEND
                        Housing Strategy & Advice
                        £172,930
                        £173,256
                        £189,060
                        £191,958
                        £195,150
                        £230,401
                        £260,650
                        £249,280£249,280£249,280£249,280
                        Homelessness
                        £404,030
                        £466,507
                        £557,180
                        £537,084
                        £507,640
                        £424,259
                        £419,220
                        £397,940
                        £397,940
                        £397,940
                        £397,940
                        Domestic Violence Outreach Worker
                        £0
                        £0
                        £0
                        £0
                        £0
                        £0
                        £26,870
                        £26,870£26,870£28,50029,360
                        In addition to Waverley’s General Fund supports disabled adaptations work and other renovation work through grants from its General Fund Capital Programme. Current spending is shown in Table 7.2.2.

                        Table 8.3.2 General Fund Capital Programme and Projections

                        2002/03
                        ESTIMATED SPEND
                        2002/03
                        ACTUAL SPEND
                        2003/04
                        ESTIMATED SPEND
                        2003/04
                        ACTUAL SPEND
                        2004/05
                        ESTIMATED SPEND
                        2004/05
                        ACTUAL SPEND
                        2005/06
                        ESTIMATED SPEND
                        2006/07
                        ESTIMATED SPEND
                        2007/8 ESTIMATED SPEND
                        2008/9 ESTIMATED SPEND
                        2009/10 ESTIMATED SPEND
                        Renovation Grants
                        £205,000
                        £205,666
                        £205,000
                        £198,493
                        £125,000
                        £106,691
                        £100,000
                        £100,000
                        £125,000
                        £125,000
                        £125,000
                        Disabled Facilities Grants
                        £165,000
                        £188,285
                        £165,000
                        £230,411
                        £225,000
                        £302,367
                        £325,000
                        £350,000
                        £350,000
                        £400,000
                        £400,000
                        Housing Needs
                        £0
                        £0
                        £0
                        £5,000
                        £0
                        £0
                        £5,000
                        £40,000
                        £0
                        £0
                        £0
                        Housing Condition Survey
                        £0
                        £0
                        £0
                        £0
                        £0
                        £0
                        £0
                        £80,000
                        £0
                        £0
                        £0
                        Choice Based Lettings
                        £0
                        £0
                        £0
                        £0
                        £0
                        £0
                        £0
                        £40,000
                        £40,000
                        £40,000
                        £40,000
                        Careline
                        £20,000
                        £20,000
                        £20,000
                        £20,000
                        £20,000
                        £20,000
                        £18,000
                        £30,000
                        £30,000
                        £30,000
                        £30,000
                        Telecare
                        £0
                        £0
                        £0
                        £0
                        £0
                        £0
                        £0
                        £10,000
                        £10,000
                        £10,000
                        £10,000
                        The anticipated spending on the creation of new affordable housing by the Council and its partners is set out in table 7.2.3.

                        Table 8.3.4 Spending on Affordable Housing

                        Funding source
                        Actual resources 2004/05

                        Actual resources 2005/06

                        Estimated resources 2006/07

                        Estimated resources 2007/08

                        Estimated resources 2008/09

                        Estimated resources 2009/10

                        Waverley Borough Council

                        £0

                        £1,000,000

                        DIYSO

                        £940,000

                        Estimated right-to-buy receipts available£940,000

                        £2,000,000Estimated right-to-buy receipts available

                        Committed to developing social housing at East Street£0

                        £0


                        Registered Social Landlords

                        £363,000

                        £783,570

                        £500,000

                        Anticipated on basis of previous allocations£500,000Anticipated on basis of previous allocations£500,000Anticipated on basis of previous allocations£500,000Anticipated on basis of previous allocations

                        Regional Housing Board

                        £5,528,293

                        Allocation from the Regional Housing Board

                        £3,822,580

                        £1,182,000


                        Allocation from the Regional Housing Board

                        Housing Corporation Housing Capital Allocation


                        £1,911,032

                        Allocation from the Regional Housing Board£7,855,322Allocation from the Regional Housing Board£4,675,000Anticipated on basis of previous allocations£4,675,000Anticipated on basis of previous allocations

                        Developers; Section.106 Agreements

                        £0

                        £655,000

                        Commuted sum

                        £250,000

                        Anticipated on basis of previous commuted sums£250,000Anticipated on basis of previous commuted sums£250,000Anticipated on basis of previous commuted sums£250,000Anticipated on basis of previous commuted sums
                        8.5 Housing Revenue Account

                        The table below shows the Council’s Housing Revenue Account spending with actual against estimated costs for the previous two years and details the projected spend for the current year.

                        DescriptionEstimate 02/03Actual 02/03Estimate 03/04Actual 03/04Estimate 04/05Actual 04/05Estimate 05/06Estimate 04/05
                        Applications & lettings
                        £222,200
                        £225,093
                        £238,290
                        £241,610
                        £252,240
                        £256,643
                        £285,500
                        £294,065
                            Rent collection
                        £484,380
                        £490,673
                        £543,510
                        £551,092
                        £625,330
                        £548,452
                        £601,300
                        £617,839
                            Policy & management**
                        £1,108,040
                        £1,112,256
                        £1,372,040
                        £1,390,689
                        £1,435,360
                        £2,021,991
                        £2,225,500
                        £1,859,076
                            Tenant participation**
                        £34,000
                        £10,189
                        £17,000
                        £15,476
                        £85,000
                        £139,355
                        £85,000
                        £45,000
                            Tenancy enforcement
                        £526,810
                        £533,654
                        £430,300
                        £436,302
                        £455,490
                        £455,924
                        £532,000
                        £527,360
                        Repairs & maintenance - planned
                        NONE FROM REVENUE
                        £695,950
                        £695,950
                        £595,950
                        £256,950
                        Repairs & maintenance - responsive
                        £3,261,550
                        £3,002,991
                        £2,985,490
                        £2,982,562
                        £2,890,460
                        £2,889,514
                        £3,127,220
                        £3,905,910
                            Maintenance of open spaces grounds maint’ce
                        £90,000
                        £95,857
                        £110,000
                        £134,709
                        £110,000
                        £139,887
                        £135,000
                        £149,000
                            Community services (sheltered wardens etc.)
                        £1,751,760
                        £1,719,732
                        £646,240*
                        £668,143
                        £783,030
                        £850,118
                        £1,082,680
                        £1,051,730
                            Rent rebates (Negative subsidy)
                        £8,716,410
                        £8,615,653
                        £9,128,070
                        £9,289,522
                        (7,734,600)
                        (£7,847,982)
                        (£8,082,000)
                        (£8,660,000)
                            Major Repairs Allowance
                        £3,111,000
                        £3,111,000
                        £3,164,800
                        £3,200,828
                        £3,439,670
                        £3,439,670
                        £3,478,810
                        £3,487,230
                        Cost of capital and other expenses
                        £421,100
                        £413,288
                        £395,710
                        £330,999
                        £436,440
                        £345,170
                        £395,390
                        £389,470
                        Support costs separated out on introduction of Supporting People
                        ** Heavily effected by option appraisal and stock transfer consultation 1 off costs

                        Each year the Council’s Housing Revenue Account (HRA) budget is considered by Council Members in parallel with its General Fund budget, culminating in the setting of rent and council tax levels for the forthcoming year. In considering its HRA budget each year the Council has regard to the level of service it is able to provide to help it achieve its stated aims and also how the service can be improved whilst still containing rents at a reasonable level and within the confines of the Government’s rent restructuring guidelines.

                        8.6 General Fund Asset Management Plan 2002

                        The Asset Management Plan has been implemented in order to ensure the Council takes a corporate and strategic approach to managing its corporate assets.

                        Housing related objectives include:

                        · The maintenance of land and property records on computerised terrier
                        · Continuous review of reasons for current use and retention of property
                        · Identification of opportunity cost for all uses of council owned property
                        · Review of planned maintenance programmes to ensure adequate and accurate budget provision
                        · Investigation of alternative uses for surplus property and vigorous marketing, if disposal is determined
                        · Ensuring that all service occupiers of corporate property have clearly defined maintenance responsibilities
                        · Continue to seek methods of imposing energy efficiency and sustainable development.

                        The property service has adopted new property performance indicators to enable monitoring of performance year on year and to allow realistic targets to be set.

                        8.7 Housing Revenue Account Asset Management Strategy

                        A Housing Revenue Account Asset Management Strategy is currently being prepared. Fundamentally it will balance the economic value of the stock against the social and economic needs of the residents.

                        The scope of the strategy is intended to achieve the following objectives:

                        · To define Waverley Borough Council’s position on asset management as a core HRA business objective
                        · To define the property stock, its condition and identify the investment required to sustain the building to meet the needs of current and future tenants over the next 30 years
                        · To identify the risks and issues relating to the assets and how these can be mitigated and dealt with
                        · To define the methods and ways that implementation of the Asset management strategy can be carried out
                        · To establish frameworks and templates for monitoring recording and evaluating performance.

                        Accompanying the Asset Management Strategy will be a database of all properties, which will incorporate structural and financial information on the property together with its Housing Need index rating.

                        This mix of information will produce a red, amber or green reinvestment status for each individual property, enabling investment decisions on future maintenance and or redevelopment to be taken in a consistent way.

                        The Asset Management strategy will include the following strategies and policies:

                        · Stock Condition Survey report
                        · Decent Home Analysis
                        · Procurement strategy and Policy
                        · Void Standard
                        · Terms of reference for the Reinvestment Panel.

                        8.8 Waverley Capital Strategy

                        The Capital Strategy recognises the key role of capital investment in achieving delivery of Waverley’s corporate and service objectives. Together with the Asset Management Plan and this Housing Strategy it seeks to ensure that optimum benefit is obtained for the residents of the Borough from the limited available capital resources.

                        The Housing Services' requirement for capital resources attempts to find a balance between the Council’s roles as:
                        · A steward for the local community and environment for the present and future generations
                        · Strategic Housing Authority for the whole of the Waverley area;
                        · Landlord for some 5,100 dwellings;
                        · Housing enabler in the Waverley area
                        · Partner to Registered Social Landlords through providing grants and land;
                        · Partner to private-sector landlords and homeowners though providing Home Improvement Grants Disabled Facilities Grants and enabling equity share/release loans.

                        The housing element of the four-year Capital Strategy is based on the Council’s Housing Strategy and Housing Investment Programme. These documents have been developed in consultation with tenants and a wide range of partners in the statutory and voluntary sector including the Government Office for the South East and the Housing Corporation. It takes into account the Council’s Corporate Strategy and service-related information such as the Tenant Participation Compact; Housing Needs Survey information that is regularly updated; the Local Authority Housing Stock Condition Survey information that again is regularly updated.

                        9. PRIORITIES

                        The priorities for housing for the lifetime of this plan reflect the changed nature of the housing service provided by the Council. The priorities are ranked in order of importance, with the highest priority as number one.

                        1. Facilitating the provision of affordable housing

                        Why is this a priority?

                        As had been discussed in detail in the Housing Needs section of this Strategy, local house prices in Waverley are significantly above the average for the South East region, making it more difficult to access good quality, affordable housing. Our partners in the statutory, voluntary and private sector regularly tell us in consultation exercises, that the availability of affordable housing is an issue. As an employer, Waverley knows how difficult it can be to recruit staff because of the high housing costs in this part of the country. Consequently the provision of affordable housing is a high corporate priority, has been highlighted as an area of concern by the Local Strategic Partnership in the Waverley Community Strategy and has been ranked as the highest priority for this housing strategy,

                        An update to the Housing Needs Survey (carried out in 2005) concluded a yearly household income of £37,000 is required to purchase an average priced flat in the area is. 75% of local households earn less than this amount. The Council’s Housing Needs register held 2,259 applications as at 1.4.05. Right to Buy has depleted the Council’s stock and ability to re-house people in housing need. Furthermore, private rented accommodation at an affordable level is in short supply. The 2005 update to the Housing Needs Survey estimated an annual shortfall of 622 affordable units every year.

                        Therefore, facilitating the provision of affordable housing in Waverley is considered the highest priority of the Housing Strategy.

                        2. Meeting Decent Homes Standard

                        Why is this a priority?

                        Not only should people be able to access affordable housing, but also that housing should be of a good standard; regardless of tenure.

                        The Council believes that every tenant deserves to live in a decent home. A decent home is at the heart of a sustainable community. The Government is challenging local authorities to meet the Decent Homes Standard in public housing by 2010. Waverley faces a number of challenges, which makes meeting the Decent Homes Standard a key priority. 53% of all the council housing does not currently meet the Decent Homes Standard. Following a rigorous Options Appraisal in 2004 the Council then balloted its tenants on whether or not the stock should be transferred to a newly-created RSL in order to take advantage of the financial freedoms that would have been enabled the DHS to have been exceeded. Tenants voted against this proposal and the Council now faces the difficult task of attempting to meet the Government deadline with extremely restricted resources whilst still delivering a good quality service to its tenants.

                        Within the private sector we have to rise to the government’s challenge of ensuring that by 2010 70% of vulnerable owner-occupiers have a decent home. It is estimated that 30% of the private sector stock in Waverley is non -decent and that 2,211 households are occupied by vulnerable households. This clearly is an issue that Waverley needs to address. Additionally, while relatively small in numbers, Houses in Multiple Occupation need to be individually inspected in order to ensure that they meet the mandatory licensing requirements.

                        3. Sustainable Communities

                        Why is this a priority?

                        A high priority of this strategy is to facilitate the development of places where people want to live, which are socially, economically and environmentally sustainable. With rolling wooded hills, heath lands, farmland, good transport links and vibrant towns and villages, Waverley is an attractive place to live and work. It is a Corporate priority to ‘maintain an attractive and sustainable environment’ in order to retain the special character of the countryside, towns and villages in Waverley.

                        It is a balance to protect and enhance the Borough's environmental quality and jobs, infrastructure and services without undermining the value of built, natural and man-managed environmental resources; work continues across Waverley in order to respond appropriately to local need whilst preserving the unique characteristic of the Borough. For example, a key corporate objective is to encourage energy efficiency, especially in housing.

                        Even though Waverley remains one of the safest places to live and work in England and Wales, many people in the Borough are worried that they will become victims of crime and feel that their quality of life is impaired by factors in their social environment such as speeding traffic and vandalism. Consequently, the promotion of community safety and addressing crime and the fear of crime through is a high priority; both for the housing department and the council as a whole. Waverley is ranked low on the indices of deprivation, at 340th out of 354 English councils. Despite Waverley’s relative wealth there are still pockets of deprivation in wards such as Godalming North East and South West. 4% of wards in the district fall within the 50% most deprived wards nationally.

                        It is believed that a commitment to promoting sustainable communities is a vital component to the Housing Strategy for the foreseeable future.

                        4. Working with disadvantaged and vulnerable people

                        Why is this a priority?

                        Many people living in the Borough need support or assistance in their day-to-day lives. Services to meet these needs could be provided in a range of ways, including round the clock intensive services, through to less intensive services such as floating or outreach support. Support may be required in order to meet a range of support needs including multiple or complex needs and learning difficulties, mental health problems and physical and sensory impairments. Census data demonstrates that the elderly population of the Borough is steadily increasing with the greatest increase in people over 80. This has implications for the provision of support for people within their own homes and specialist accommodation in the future. Within the private sector there is a significant and increasing number of elderly people who are capital rich but revenue poor.

                        A range of support initiatives have been developed but it is recognised that more research is required into the needs of vulnerable groups. In addition, more work is required build upon existing work between local providers in order to ensure more seamless services are provided to the disadvantaged and vulnerable. Waverley Borough Council recognise a number of gaps exist in housing provision for people with support needs and so has prioritised cross borough partnership work with housing and support providers to develop housing and support services.

                        Funding through the Supporting People programme is limited and consequently the Surrey Supporting People Strategy has a clear commitment to prioritising funding to those most in need. This is resulting in the need for resources to be reallocated and Waverley is committed to working in partnership to facilitate this. For these reasons working with the disadvantaged and vulnerable is a high priority for Waverley.

                        5. Continuing to reduce and prevent homelessness

                        Why is this a priority?

                        Tackling homelessness has been central to the Government’s social inclusion agenda and all local authorities have a role to play. Waverley has been successful in meeting the Government’s targets regarding the use of B&B and is now focused on meeting the Governments target to reduce the number of households in temporary accommodation by 2010. Whilst the issue of homelessness in Waverley is no longer critical due to the success of recent work it still remains an overall priority for Waverley Borough Council.

                        To date Waverley has been successful in meeting the government’s target in not having homeless households with children in B&B for more than 6 weeks. The Council has embraced the prevention of homelessness agenda and has been successful in opening up private renting opportunities for households threatened with homelessness through effective use of its deposit bond and cash deposit schemes. In the quarter April -Jun 05 the Council has achieved a reduction in homeless applications and a reduction in homeless acceptances compared with the same quarter last year. These encouraging figures, if maintained throughout the year, will help the Council meet the Governments target in reducing by 50% the number of households in temporary accommodation by 2010 and continue a downward trend in homeless applications, decisions and acceptances.

                        There has also been a significant improvement in homelessness decision times and the number of families with dependent children in temporary accommodation has fallen.

                        There has not been a significant reduction in length of time households with children are in hostel accommodation. The Council’s ability to achieve a reduction is dependent on a number of factors outside of its control including the number and type of vacancies that occur and the fact that in giving homeless households a choice of where to live, this can greater extend the length of time a household may have to wait for a suitable vacancy. A new allocation policy will help give some additional priority to homeless households who have been in temporary accommodation for a while to help reduce the time scales but this has to be done in a balanced may so as not to disadvantage non homeless applicant in housing need.

                        10. OPTIONS

                        The following tables illustrate a range of options which have been considered by the council and why they were subsequently discounted.

                        1. Facilitating the provision of affordable Housing
                        Discounted
                        OptionReasoning
                        Promote private rental sectorAlthough the Council works with private landlords, because of high value properties it is unprofitable for the private sector to purchase homes on the open market to let at low rents.
                        Promote self-build initiativesWe have piloted this in the past with the Young Builders Trust. High land values, high levels of employment and long working hours for families conspire to make self build a difficult option for potential participants and there is no obvious demand for such an initiative.
                        Employ additional resources to deal with empty homesOptions available to Local Authorities to bring empty properties back into use include the use of Compulsory Purchase Orders and appointing Empty Homes Officers. However, as there are relatively few empty homes in Waverley, the question is raised as to whether pursuing this area would result in much supply. Most empty homes are either in the process of going through Probate or are ancillary accommodation on country estates.
                        Prioritising traditional affordable sheltered housing schemes The Housing Needs Survey indicates an increasing elderly population. Rather than prioritising traditional sheltered affordable housing schemes, feasibility studies into re-designating existing schemes into extra care schemes have been undertaken.


                        5. Continuing to reduce and prevent homelessness
                        Discounted
                        OptionReasoning
                        Develop Surrey Wide Accommodation Support Worker schemeOfficers are working towards securing funding to support this scheme and the outcome of a bid to the Department for Communities and Local Government is awaited.
                        Homeless Support Worker for WaverleyAs yet, no funding has been identified to support this post. If successful, the above bid would also support this post.
                        Women’s Refuge for domestic violenceRather than setting up a refuge, the Council has decided to explore alternative options such as an equivalent to the sanctuary schemes or a safe house to help reduce disruption of support networks for victims of domestic violence.
                        Homeless at HomeThis option was discounted as it was felt there was a danger of this scheme being used to fast track cases into permanent accommodation when there was no genuine threat of homelessness.


                        11. MONITORING AND MEASURING THE HOUSING STRATEGY

                        This strategy is a working document, which will be reviewed and updated regularly in order to ensure the delivery of the housing strategy action plan. The action plan provides a detailed list of SMART targets. These are Specific, Measurable, Achievable, Realistic and Time-related. Monitoring and reviews will be carried out using a range of mechanisms:

                        1 Building on strategic and corporate links

                        The Housing Strategy Action Plan links into a wider range of partner strategies and targets, including the Corporate Plan, Community Strategy, Homelessness Strategy and Community Safety Strategy. These documents are reviewed and reported on at the end of each financial year.

                        2 Involving and consulting Progress on Housing Strategy objectives and actions will be reported to the Community Overview and Scrutiny Committee on an annual basis. Information will be shared across a range of relevant forums, for example the Waverley Chief Officers Group, Surrey Supporting People Joint Management Board and the Waverley Registered Social Landlords Forum.

                        Regular features on housing issues will continue to be reported to residents through press releases, information journals and council publications. These publications include The Link (which is distributed to every home in the Borough) Waverley Homes (received by Waverley tenants) and the Housing Options Newsletter (distributed to all housing applicants).

                        A Housing Strategy database will be set up on Lotus Notes, to enable all members and staff to access the Housing Strategy, minutes from Housing Implementation Group meetings, updates and action-plans electronically and return feedback and comments. Stakeholder consultation collected through a range of forums including an annual conference will inform future updates.

                        3 Housing Strategy Steering Group The Council has set up a Housing Strategy Steering Group, who will meet regularly in order to ensure the Strategy remains a live document. Representatives include officers from the housing, planning, legal and finance services. The group will oversee an annual review of the Housing Strategy. The review will examine our performance against the targets set in the action plan, taking into account any relevant national and regional policy changes as well as local factors.

                        4 Managing Performance

                        The Council continues to recognise the importance of clear and effective performance management and employs a model of continuous planning, implementing, reviewing and re-adjusting our activities. Each service submits quarterly performance data, which shows progress against performance indicators from individual service plans and performance is compared to other organisations through the House Mark Cost Bench Marking. This data feeds into the Best Value Performance Indicators, which are published in the Corporate Plan.

                        Performance Improvement Groups have been established for key services, so as to ensure corporate objectives and priorities translate via the Housing Strategy into operational objectives/priorities as contained in continuous improvement plans for each service area. These can then be fed on to individual Personal Review and Development Plans with the groups meeting every six weeks (see figure 1.)


                        Figure 1 Circle of Continuous Improvement
                        12. ACTION PLAN
                        Housing Priority
                        1 Affordable Housing
                        Action PointCorporate PriorityService Aim/PriorityActionResourcesMonitoringCurrent positionLead OfficerAgreed timescale
                        A121, 25Facilitate the provision of good quality local housingProgress development of affordable housing which includes a mix of general needs and Key Worker homes for rent and Homebuy products· Allocation of £9.36m from Regional Housing Board/Housing Corporation for development between 2004-2006
                        · £25,000 of Recycled Capital Grant Funding (RCGF) monies 2004-2006
                        · £9.8m Allocation from Regional Housing Board/Housing Corporation 2006-2008 (
                        · Key Worker Living Initiative
                        · Within existing resources· Registered Social Landlord (RSL) liaison meetings
                        · RSL quarterly forum
                        · Site meetingsSchemes on site
                        o 88 rented homes
                        o 28 Key Worker homes
                        o 25 Homebuy homes

                        With planning permission
                        o 63 rented homes
                        o 27 Key Worker homes
                        o 16 Homebuy homes

                        In pipeline
                        o 41 rented homes
                        o 12 Key Worker homes
                        o 30 Homebuy homesHousing Strategy and Enabling ManagerCompletion phased through until April 2006/2008

                        A221,31Maximise use of Council assetsDisposal of land · Within existing staff resources
                        · Use of consultants £30,000
                        · Liaison with planningConsultants appointed to produce schemeHousing Strategy and Enabling ManagerDecember 2006 for planning approval
                        A313,14,15,18Increasing supply of affordable housingFeed into the Local Development Framework (LDF) and Housing Development Plan (HDP) Document, to reflect need for and ensure commitment to affordable housing· Within existing staff resources· Liaison with planningOngoing work with the planning departmentPrincipal PlannerSubmit Housing Development Document to Secretary of State December 2006
                        A418, 21Increasing supply of affordable housingWork with planners, landowners and developers to ensure affordable housing requirements in local plan and future LDF plans are met and exceeded where possible· Within existing staff resources· Joint meetings with plannersOngoing joint housing and planning negotiations with developers on s.106 sites. Affordable housing requirements to be reviewed as part of LDFHousing Strategy and Enabling ManagerOngoing

                        A518, 21, 29, 30Increasing supply of affordable housingDevelop Policy on commuted sums to be included in LDF· £2,400 consultancy fees during 2005 negotiations
                        · Within existing staff resources
                        · Chief Officers Group (COG)Formula tested in negotiations in 2005. Director of HousingApril 2006
                        A618, 21, 29, 30Increasing supply of affordable housingDevelop Policy for negotiating affordable housing without grant funding to be included in LDF· Within existing staff resources· COGIn discussions with Housing Associations and developers regarding grant free developments. Director of HousingApril 2006
                        A710, 19Increasing supply of affordable housingMonitor level of empty homes and take appropriate action· £500 administration costs
                        · Within existing staff resources
                        · Best Value Performance Indicators (BVPI)
                        Housing Strategy Statistical Appendix (HSSA)
                        · Service Plan
                        Yearly mail out to empty homes
                        Information available on website
                        Individual action taken as required
                        Housing Strategy and Enabling Manager

                        Team Leader (Housing) E&L
                        Annually
                        A818, 21, 22Understanding housing needFull Housing Needs Survey · £40,000 of existing resources· Internal Management Team (IMT)
                        · Service Plan
                        Full Housing Needs Survey 2001
                        Updated in 2003 and 2005
                        Consideration of replacing with Housing Market Assessment in partnership with Guildford and Woking Borough Council
                        Housing Strategy and Enabling Manger2006/7
                        A98, 23Understanding Housing NeedInvestigate needs of BME groups· Included in above
                        · Within existing staff resources
                        · BVPI'sHousing Needs Survey to look at BME needsHousing Strategy and Enabling Manager2006/7
                        A1018, 21, 22Understand Housing NeedInvestigate the need for specialist housing · Within existing staff resources· IMTUndertake needs mapping exercise with specialist providersStrategy and Enabling Officer2006
                        A1122, 23, 30, 32Improve and enhance existing services and working arrangementsRestructure housing department· £25,000
                        · Within existing resources
                        · IMT
                        · COG
                        Stock transfer ballot result to retain council stock December 2005Chief Executive/ Director of Housing2007/2008
                        A1210,14,15, 21, 28, 30Develop multi agency/cross Borough/County wide workingHold Affordable Housing Conference for developers· £1,000 from within existing resources· Team Meeting Conference for RSL’s and developers held March 2005Housing Strategy and Enabling ManagerNovember 2006


                        Housing Priority 2
                        Meeting Decent Homes Standard for all Tenures
                        Action PointCorporate PriorityService Aim/PriorityActionResourcesMonitoringProgress/ResultLead OfficerAgreed timescale
                        B122, 29, 30, 31Meeting Decent Homes Standard in Waverley Borough Council owned homesProduce Rolling programme to ensure health and safety issues prioritised· Housing Revenue Account (HRA)· IMT90% of stock condition survey undertaken. 54% of stock does not meet Decent Homes.Head of Housing MaintenanceYearly until 2010/11
                        B222, 23, 29, 30, 31Meeting Decent Homes Standard in Waverley Borough Council owned homesPursue trickle transfer of void properties to partner RSL’s· HRA· IMTStock transfer ballot result to retain council stock December 2005Assistant Director of HousingYearly until 2010/11
                        B322, 23, 29, 30, 31Meeting Decent Homes Standard in Waverley Borough Council owned homesReview all Housing Revenue Account Services with a view to reducing costs and/or services in order to find additional funds to contribute towards capital works so as to work towards meeting Decent Homes Standard· HRA· IMTStock transfer ballot result to retain council stock December 2005Director of HousingYearly until 2010/11

                        B422, 23, 29, 30, 31Meeting Decent Homes Standard in Waverley Borough Council owned homesReview Service Level Agreements for all core support services in order to make costs savings · HRA· IMTStock transfer ballot result to retain council stock December 2005Director of HousingYearly until 2010/11
                        B522, 23, 29, 30, 31Meeting Decent Homes Standard in Waverley Borough Council owned homesBest Value review of retained functions in order to make savings· HRA· IMTStock transfer ballot result to retain council stock December 2005Director of Housing2007/08
                        B622, 23Meeting Decent Homes Standard in other social housingMonitoring and encouraging RSL’s to meet Decent Homes standard· Within existing staff resources· Annual reports from Housing AssociationInformation mapping exercise carried out 2004Housing Strategy and Enabling ManagerYearly until 2010/11
                        B722, 23Contribute to the Decent Home StandardReview Waverley Home Improvement Policy· Within existing staff resources· Annual reviewPolicy under reviewTeam Leader (Housing) E&L2006/7
                        B822, 23Contribute to the Decent Home StandardUndertake a private sector house conditions survey· £80, 000 from Capital programme· Team MeetingsBRE housing stock projection completed March 2005. Full house conditions survey planned for 2006/7
                        Agreement in principle to carry out joint survey with Guildford Borough Council January 2006
                        Team Leader (Housing) E&L 2006/7
                        B922, 23Contribute to the Decent Home StandardManage introduction of HMO Licensing· £15,000 within existing staff resources· Team MeetingsWork started August 2005Team Leader (Housing) E&L2006/7
                        B1010, 20, 22Contribute to the Decent Home StandardProduce and distribute a range of advice leaflets· £2,500
                        · Within existing staff resources
                        · Annual reviewLeaflets produced for current home improvements policy schemes, now awaiting review of home improvement policyTeam Leader (Housing) E&L2006/7
                        B1122Contribute to the Decent Home StandardMeet Public Service Agreement Target for vulnerable people in decent housing· £100,000 from Capital Programme· Annual reviewBRE report has established current position. Further improvements to be monitoredTeam Leader (Housing) E&LYearly until 2010/11


                        Housing Priority 3
                        Sustainable Communities
                        Action PointCorporate objectiveService Aim/PriorityActionResourcesMonitoringProgress/ResultLead OfficerAgreed timescale
                        C113, 21Facilitate provision of good quality local housingRural Housing Surveys to document need for the development of affordable housing in rural areas, when required· £1,000 within existing resources as and when required· RSL liaison meetings
                        · Quarterly RSL forumPartnership establishedHousing Strategy and Enabling ManagerAs required
                        C213, 21Facilitate provision of good quality local housingHold Rural Housing Seminar every 2 years· £1,000 per conference within existing resources· Quarterly RSL forumAffordable Housing Conference held March 2005Housing Strategy and Enabling Manager2007
                        2009
                        C322Ensuring balanced communities within the BoroughIntroduce Choice Based Lettings Scheme
                        · £80,000 capital funding and £15,000 revenue costs per year during 2006/7 and 2007/8 via bid to Department for Communities and Local Government· IMTReport to committee to seek members approval for CBL in June 2005
                        Staff visit to CBL authority in July 2005
                        Announcement of successful bid November 2005Housing Needs Manager 2007
                        C418, 21Develop multi agency/cross Borough/County wide workingContinue ongoing work with Blackwater Valley Housing and Planning Officers Groups to progress cross boundary issues at the sub regional level, including the Aldershot Urban Extension· Within existing staff resources· Housing and Planning Officers meetingDiscussions about resource implications and nomination agreementsHousing Strategy and Enabling Manager
                        Principal Planner2007 and beyond
                        C52, 3, 10, 22, 23Work with partners to reduce crime and disorder and the fear of crimeContinue to actively support Community Incident Action group to ensure a multi agency approach to crime prevention and solving problems· Within existing staff resources· Team meeting
                        · Tenant satisfaction levelsAppointed Anti social Behaviour Officer and published policy and procedureHousing Services ManagerOngoing
                        C62, 3, 10, 22, 23Improve customer service for tenancy/estate managementDevelop local meetings with tenants and to support and work with neighbourhood panels set up by the Police to raise and resolve issues. This will involve partnership working with other agencies and council departments· Within existing staff resources· Team meetings
                        · Tenant satisfaction levelsOfficers have attended 9 neighbourhood panel meetings, held workshops on parking and anti social behaviour and involved tenants through 6 estate based meetingsHousing Services ManagerOngoing
                        C720Enable owner-occupiers and private sector tenants to make their homes energy efficient and secure against crimeProvide information and assistance to assist householders to reduce their emissions· £2,000 for leaflets
                        · Within staff existing resources· BVPI
                        · Team meetingsOngoing information and signing to relevant organisations. Information available on the websiteHead of Environmental ServicesOngoing
                        C820Enable owner-occupiers and private sector tenants to make their homes energy efficient and secure against crimeReview ways of reducing negative impacts on environment and sustainability· Within existing staff resources· Team meetingsPublish sustainability action plan
                        Adoption of green travel policy
                        Adopting fair trade policyHead of Environmental ServicesOngoing
                        C920Enable owner-occupiers and private sector tenants to make their homes energy efficient and secure against crimePromote
                        · Warm Front Scheme
                        · Energy Care Network
                        · Heat Surrey Project· £2,500 for leaflets/ publicity
                        · Within existing staff resources· Team MeetingsEnergy Care networkers event to be held at Waverley autumn 2005. Referrals made continuallyTeam Leader (Housing) E&L

                        Team Leader (Pollution) E&LOngoing



                        Housing Priority 4
                        Working with disadvantaged and vulnerable people
                        Action PointCorporate PriorityService Aim/PriorityActionResourcesMonitoringProgress/ResultLead OfficerAgreed timescale
                        D17, 8, 23Improve customer services for disabled adaptationsReview service to fast track minor adaptations to improve quality of life· Within existing resources
                        · HRA· Team meetingsProject plan created currently in pilot phaseHousing Services Manager2006
                        D28Increase the knowledge of housing needs and homelessness in the BoroughCarry out needs assessment of travellers· Within existing staff resources· Housing and Planning Liaison MeetingsMapping on existing evidence July 2005Principal Planner2006
                        D324, 25Preventing HomelessnessExplore potential of developing a year round hostel for vulnerable homeless people· Housing Revenue Account
                        · Explore funding options
                        · IMTNeed for hostel for single people still evident. Ongoing work underway to undertake costings find suitable site and secure fundingHousing Needs Manager2007/8
                        D424, 31Preventing HomelessnessContinue to identify suitable WBC land, which can be used to facilitate the development of supported accommodation· Within existing staff resources· RSL liaison group
                        ·
                          IMTThe Council may need to consider taking a more “commercial” approach to land disposal to raise capital for the Housing Revenue Account to invest in meeting the Decent Homes StandardHousing Strategy and Enabling ManagerOngoing
                        D524, 25Preventing HomelessnessReview need for specialist domestic violence accommodation further to Sanctuary pilot scheme· HRA· IMTSanctuary pilot completedHousing Needs ManagerOngoing
                        D65, 8, 22Multi agency cross borough county initiativesWork with neighbour Boroughs and Surrey Supporting People Team to achieve greater support and accommodation for people with support needs including
                        multiple needs,
                        learning difficulties, mental health issues,
                        people fleeing domestic violence
                        and young people· Regional Housing Board/ Housing Corporation
                        · Surrey Supporting People Team· IMTSupported housing for young people developed in partnership with Guildford Borough Council and Stonham Housing Association May 2005 Housing Needs Manager
                        Housing Strategy and Enabling ManagerOngoing
                        D77Support home owners and private sector tenants in carrying out necessary improvements to their homes within the context of the Council’s wider strategic objectives to improve quality of life, health and the environmentReview Disabled Facilities Grant (DFG) procedures in light of Surrey DFG project· Within existing staff resources· Private sector Team MeetingsOngoing review of paperwork and consultation with Occupational Therapy departmentTeam Leader (Housing) E&L2006/7
                        D87Support home owners and private sector tenants in carrying out necessary improvements to their homes within the context of the Council’s wider strategic objectives to improve quality of life, health and the environmentContinue to support Age Concern Handy Person Service· Grant aid Age Concern Waverley total of £32,000
                        · Within existing staff resources· COG
                        · Team MeetingsOngoingDirector of Housing 2005/06


                        Housing Priority 5
                        Continuing to reduce and prevent homelessness
                        Action PointCorporate objectiveService Aim/PriorityActionResourcesMonitoringProgress/ResultLead OfficerAgreed timescale
                        E122, 24, 25Increasing quality and supply of temporary accommodation and services to residentsCustomer surveys of residents in temporary accommodation
                        · Within existing staff resources
                        · £500· Team meetings
                        Work planned for 2005/6Housing Needs Manager2006/2007
                        E222, 24, 25Increasing quality and supply of temporary accommodation and services to residentsHomeless Hostel to be upgraded and converted into self-contained units.· £621,000
                        · HRA· IMTWork tendered
                        Start on site summer 2005
                        Completion due spring 2006Assistant Director of Housing2006
                        E310, 22, 24, 25Improving Homelessness and Housing Advice servicesProduce customer charter/ service standards· Within existing staff resources
                        · £2,500· Team MeetingsWork planned for 2005/6Housing Needs Manager2006
                        E422, 23, 24, 25, 30Preventing HomelessnessPromote Private Sector landlords forum· £1,000 within existing resources· Surrey Housing Needs Managers Group
                        Joint forum with Guildford and Woking established March 2005Housing Needs Manager

                        Team Leader (Housing) E&LAnnually
                        E524, 25, 29, 30Preventing HomelessnessMeet Government Targets in working to reduce homelessness and use of temporary accommodation· Within existing resources· IMT
                        · BVPI’sIn 2004/5 homeless applications, acceptances and numbers in temporary accommodation all reducedHousing Needs ManagerOngoing
                        E623, 26, 29, 30Maximise rental incomeReview and improve standard letters to incorporate signposting to independent financial advice.· Within existing staff resources· Team MeetingsAlready achieving 98.9% rent income in 2004/05
                        CAB details on all arrears letters. Staff received benefits training to advise and refer accordinglyRent Accounts ManagerOngoing
                        E723, 26, 29, 30Maximise rental incomeMinimise loss through arrears and bad debts· Within existing resources· Team Meetings
                        · BVPI’sReviewing arrears collection procedure, former tenants arrears procedure revised. Close work with HB on discretionary HB paymentsRent Accounts ManagerOngoing

                        For a full list of Corporate Priorities please refer to the Waverley Corporate Plan 2005/2006 at www.waverley.gov.uk
                        2Work with other partners to reduce crime and disorder and the fear of crime
                        3Support measures to control and reduce late night nuisance and anti social behaviour
                        5Improve opportunities for young people
                        7Improve opportunities for those with disabilities
                        8Promotes social inclusion across the councils services (by ensuring that the needs of all members of the community are taken into account irrespective of gender, race, disability, sexual orientation, religion/belief or age)
                        10Continue to improve communication between the council and the community and encourage feedback
                        13Retain the special character of the countryside, towns and villages in Waverley Borough Council
                        14Encourage village and town health checks and parish plans with a view to incorporating them into the Local Development Framework and Community Strategy
                        15Promote and influence beneficial development to enhances and safeguard the use of land and the built and natural environment, particularly East Street, Farnham and Godalming Key Site
                        18Continue to improve planning processes
                        19Protect public health and safety
                        20Encourage energy efficiency, especially in housing
                        21Enable more affordable housing for essential workers and local young people
                        22Enable well managed and maintained social housing
                        23Enable effective and efficient support to tenants
                        24Support homeless people
                        25Minimise the use of bed and breakfast accommodation
                        26Ensure that residents receive an efficient benefits service
                        28Work with the business community and other partners to maintain the vitality of towns, villages and the rural economy
                        29Maintain prudent and sound financial management
                        30Focus on the efficient and effective delivery of priority services and the avoidance of bureaucratic costs
                        31Optimise the benefits from managing the council’s assets
                        32Employ a workforce with the right balance and skills mix to deliver the councils priorities and objectives

                        Post Holders and Contact details:

                        Director of HousingDavid January(01483) 523 361djanuary@waverley.gov.uk
                        Assistant Director of HousingJohn Swanton(01483) 523 375jswanton@waverley.gov.uk
                        Head of Housing ManagementBernard Nichols(01483) 523 373bnichols@waverley.gov.uk
                        Head of Housing MaintenanceDavid Simmons(01483) 523 374dsimmons@waverley.gov.uk
                        Housing Strategy & Development ManagerAlice Baxter(01483) 523 453abaxter@waverley.gov.uk
                        Housing Needs ManagerMike Rivers(01483) 523 013mrivers@wavereley.gov.uk
                        Housing Services ManagerSheila Goodall(01483) 523 355sgoodall@waverley.gov.uk
                        Rents Account ManagerSarah Barber(01483) 523 137sbarber@waverley.gov.uk
                        Right To Buy OfficerDoug Hamilton(01483) 523 031dhamilton@waverley.gov.uk
                        Principal PlannerPeter Hartley(01483) 523 297phartley@waverley.gov.uk
                        Head of Environmental ServicesMartin Shorten(01483) 523 434mshorten@waverley.gov.uk
                        Team Leader (Housing) E&LSimon Brisk(01483) 523 421sbrisk@waverley.gov.uk
                        Team Leader (Pollution) E&LAnna Shiner(01483) 523 435ashiner@waverley.gov.uk
                        13. PROGRESS TO DATE
                        Priorities achieved from 2002 Housing Strategy
                        No.
                        (from 2002 action plan)IssueAction takenDate
                        1Equality of OpportunityCorporate system of recording racial incidents implemented across the authority, using Council intranet.
                        Since the introduction of the system in June 2002, 15 incidents have been recordedJune 2002
                        2Affordable housing for younger householdsAffordable housing continues as a key Council priority, as reflected in the corporate plan
                        · 104 completions of affordable housing in 2002-3
                        · 74 completions of affordable housing in 2003-4
                        · 159 completions of affordable housing in 2004-5Sept 2005
                        Ongoing

                        Ongoing
                        3Make areas of deprivation a priority for investmentSupport affordable rural housing scheme for Dunsfold in partnership with Preferred Partner who have a specialism in rural housing
                        Housing Needs Survey carried out July 2005.
                        Ongoing pre-application discussions with planning, housing, RSL and developerPlanning application anticipated in November 2005
                        4 Community TransportWorking with Surrey County Council, the Countryside Agency, the DTLGR, Parish Councils and the voluntary sector to promote the ‘Hoppa’, a Borough-wide community transport project with a total of 29,722 passenger journeys made on the Hoppa Tourer, with Waverley Borough Council contributing £12.84k during 2004-5
                        Range of new initiatives developed including the Hospital Hoppa (which Waverley Borough Council contributed a one off payment of £16,850 during 2004-5) after school services, transport links to a Godalming medical practice,
                        Partnership working with the Cranleigh FLY (For Local Youth) project and ongoing work with clients of Adults and Community Care servicesOngoing
                        5Empty HomesOngoing to monitoring and support for owners to bring empty properties back into use, Due of the relatively low scale level of empty homes
                        Mailout to all owners of empty properties in Borough in partnership with Council Tax department in April 2005
                        Participation in countywide bid to bring 20 empty properties back into use over 2 years.
                        Redevelopment planned for East Street and Farnham Hospital, which currently include a number of empty properties
                        Lobbying NHS Estates, Department for Communities and Local Government and English Partnerships to use the empty properties at Milford HospitalOngoing
                        6Private Sector RenewalContinue to fund the Home Improvement Agency
                        Increase levels of investment for DFG’s and Minor Repairs Assistance. 33 DFG’s made in 2003/4 and 42 DFG’s made in 2004/5
                        Continue to support the Care and Repair Agency, which completed 34 cases in 2003/04 and Age Concern Waverley Handy Person Service Ongoing
                        Ongoing

                        Ongoing
                        7Private Rented SectorBetween April 2004 and March 2005:
                        · 38 cases assisted with Bonds at a cost of £30,918
                        · 10 cases assisted using Cash Deposits at a cost of £10,755
                        · 9 cases assisted using Rent In Advance Scheme at a cost of £4,959
                        · 2 cases assisted using Spend to Save at a cost of £895Ongoing
                        8Balance of elderly accommodation and general needs housingDecommissioning and demolishment on sheltered housing scheme in Witley
                        Decommissioning of sheltered scheme in Cranleigh in progress
                        2 further schemes designated as Extra Care
                        Difficult to let sheltered scheme replaced with general needs flats, in partnership with Mount Green Housing Association2005

                        2003

                        2005
                        2004
                        9Key Worker HousingOngoing work with Thames Valley Housing Association to maximise the Starter Homes Initiative which assisted 41 keyworkers during 2003-04 and subsequent Keyworker Living funding., which assisted 23 keyworkers through KWL 2004-5.
                        Keyworker units currently in progress:
                        · 2 homes at Farnham using £30k of funding from RHB
                        · 12 homes at Wormley using £460k from RHB
                        · 14 homes at Cranleigh using £430k from RHBOngoing

                        2005
                        10Special Needs Housing2 units for people with Epilepsy in Godalming
                        Development of accommodation for 13 single homeless people with support needs in partnership with Rushmoor and Hart Councils
                        Domestic Violence refuge in South West Surrey2004
                        2004

                        2005
                        11Supporting People‘Good’ Best Value Review2004
                        13ResourcesOngoing work with RSL’s to continue to fund a programme of housing for rent and Homebuy; as supported by an allocation of £9,356,453 in 2004 from the Regional Housing Board (RHB)
                        14Planning FrameworkSecure affordable housing opportunities through the planning system and Section 106 Agreements
                        · 33 completions of affordable housing through s.106 agreements in 2002-3
                        · 47 completions of affordable housing in 2003-4
                        · 24 completions of affordable housing in 2004-5
                        · Facilitation of workshop for RSL’s to feed into South East Plan and LDFOngoing

                        Feb 2005
                        15Rural HousingWork with Parish Councils and the Rural Housing Trust to meet the housing needs of local villages
                        £1,580,000 of allocation from the Regional Housing Board in 2004 earmarked for rural schemes.
                        The following completions of affordable housing have been made in rural areas during the past few years
                        · 2002-3= 20
                        · 2003-4= 11
                        · 2004-5= 29Ongoing
                        16Best ValueInvolve our partner RSL’s in Best Value Reviews where relevantOngoing
                        19Elderly Designated AccommodationReinvestment Panel review properties
                        Decommissioned and demolished sheltered housing scheme in Witley (2005) in order to redevelop site with housing for which there is a need (2006)
                        Decommissioning sheltered housing scheme in Cranleigh is in progressMarch 2005

                        Ongoing5
                        20GaragesOngoing rolling programme of refurbishment
                        Assessment of Council owned sites included in work programme for Asset Management TeamOngoing
                        2005
                        21Stock DisposalSale of properties, which were remote and did not meet the Decent Homes StandardMarch 2004
                        22Young Single HomelessDevelopment of supported housing project for young people in partnership with Guildford Borough Council and Stonham Housing AssociationApril 2005
                        23Rough SleepersManagement and co-ordination of Winter Watch Project to provide temporary night shelter accommodation for single hhomeless peopleDecember to March each year
                        24Domestic ViolenceDomestic Violence Outreach Service established, with 2 workers appointed2003
                        Priorities taken forward
                        No.IssueAction Date
                        3Make areas of deprivation a priority for investmentMeeting Decent Homes Standard in Waverley owned homesYearly until 20010/11
                        6Private Sector RenewalUndertake a Private Sector Stock Condition Survey2007
                        9Key Worker HousingWork with Surrey Heath Housing Association to develop Key Worker sub-market rented accommodation at Hindhead
                        Scheme not pursued as assessment found this development would not be economically viable. NA
                        12Supply/Demand GapA key corporate priority for the Council is that of helping to address the supply/demand gap for a range of affordable housingOngoing
                        17HRA Stock ConditionMeeting Decent Homes Standard in Waverley owned homesYearly until 20010/11
                        18Homeless HostelsImprovement to Waverley Homeless Hostel2005
                        21Stock DisposalsCurrently seeking planning permission to redevelop Waverley property2005


                        14. APPENDICES

                        Appendix One Glossary


                        Affordable housing – housing provided with a subsidy and made available in perpetuity to local people who cannot afford to rent or buy housing appropriate to their needs in the open housing market.

                        ALMO – Arms Length Management Organisation – a vehicle for managing the council’s housing stock whilst retaining ownership.

                        ASB – Anti Social Behaviour.

                        Assured shorthold tenancies – A tenancy agreement with a private landlord for a period of 6 months that can be renewed.

                        Audit Commission - A body appointed by the Government to be responsible for (amongst other things) the appointment of local authority’s external auditors and best value inspectors (Including the Housing Inspectorate), and promoting the best use of public money in local government.

                        Beacon council status - The Beacon Council Scheme identifies excellence and innovation in local government.

                        Best Value - The new duty, under the Local Government Act 1999, for a Local Authority to ensure that it is securing best value in all of its functions. A local performance plan must be published each year.

                        BVPI’s – Best Value performance Indicators.

                        Capital Expenditure - Broadly, this is expenditure, which will have a value over more than one year, and is therefore for the purposes of investing in a Council’s assets. In the Housing context, this will mean expenditure in the acquisition or construction of housing, and in substantial repairs and improvements. Capital expenditure can be funded through Credit Approvals, Capital Receipts, Government Grants, Contributions from a Council’s partners, or RCCO.

                        Capital Receipts - The receipt arising from the sale of an asset, for example the sale of a house under the Right to Buy. In the case of the sale of HRA assets, Government rules prescribe the proportion of the receipt which is reserved, and that which is usable.

                        Choice based lettings – A new method for Council’s allocating homes, which give applicants more choice in where they live. The approach is similar to that of an estate agent.

                        CPA – Comprehensive Performance Assessment, a rigorous assessment of the quality and impact of a council’s services.

                        Commuted sums – a cash payment arising through a planning obligation, in lieu of a planning application, which has to be applied for the benefit of the community.

                        Decent Homes – Decent Homes is a government target that all Council and Housing Associations must achieve by 2010. A Decent Home is a home that is warm, weatherproof and has reasonably modern facilities.

                        Department for Communities and Local Government – Newly created Government department, replacing the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister, with a remit to promote community cohesion and equality and responsibility for housing, urban regeneration , planning and local government.

                        DIY shared ownership – Where an individual purchases a property on the open market where either a Council of a housing association makes part of the purchase.

                        Egan Agenda - arose in response to the Rethinking Construction report of the Construction Task Force. Designed to improve the way the construction industry operates with a customer led focus concentrating on continuous improvement through innovation partnering, benchmarking, supply chain management and driving out waste.

                        Essential worker – Waverley’s definition of an essential worker is designed to compliment the term Key Worker and can include a wider range of people who are important to the provision of local services and the local economy than the Government definition, for example refuse collectors, ambulance drivers, hospital cleaners.

                        General Fund - The Local Authority account that records the revenue income and expenditure for all of its functions, except the landlord function as owner of housing stock.

                        HB – Housing Benefit.

                        HMO – A dwelling occupied by more than one or numerous households.

                        Homebuy (previously known as Shared ownership) – A form of low cost home ownership in which a household buys a portion of property (usually between 25% and 50%) and pays rent to a housing association.

                        Housing Association – A non profit-making organisation formed to provide housing.

                        Housing Corporation - The Non Departmental Government Body that is responsible for the registration, regulation, and to some extent (through the ADP) funding of RSLs.

                        Housing Register – The Council’s register of households who have applied for housing.

                        HRA - Housing Revenue Account (HRA) - This is the landlord’s account, which shows all of a Local Authority’s income and expenditure arising from its role as the owner of Housing, plus (currently), the income and expenditure related to rent rebates for Council tenants. The account is “ringfenced”; that is, no transfer can be made between it and the rest of the Council’s accounts, the “General Fund”. Other powers and duties of a Housing authority, for example the duty to the homeless, the “enabling” role in promoting Housing Association activity in the area, and grants for private sector housing are General Fund activities.

                        Housing Strategy - A Housing Strategy should be an over-arching document that reviews housing-related issues in a local authority's area, sets out its housing objectives, establishes priorities for action both by the local authority and by other service providers and stakeholders, and sets out a clear Action Plan in agreement with the council's local partners.

                        Investors in People Award - The Investors in People Standard is a business improvement tool designed to advance an organisation’s performance through its people.

                        Key Worker – A term used by the Government to define people they consider to be important to provide public services, such as police, nurses, teachers.

                        Key Worker Living – A Government funded initiative providing assistance to Key Workers to allow them to secure a home.

                        LA21 strategy – Waverley Borough Council’s environmental strategy.

                        Local Development Framework – The LDF replaces the old system of Local Plans and sets out the Council’s plans for all land use and development in the Borough, along with its policies for planning issues such as affordable housing.

                        LSP – Local Strategic Partnership, a single body comprising representatives from all sectors for the planning of local services.

                        Low cost home ownership – A broad term, which includes homebuy, equity sharing and DIYSO which enables people to get on the housing ladder.

                        Major Repairs Allowance (MRA) - A new element of Housing Subsidy, which helps council’s to maintain their stock in a good state of repair.

                        Metropolitan greenbelt – A broad swathe of land surrounding London where planning policy restricts development in an attempt to retain the green belt.

                        Options Appraisal - Government led process to establish how stock holding council’s can meet the Decent Homes Standard.

                        O&S – Overview and Scrutiny Committee

                        PI – Performance Indicator.

                        PFI – Private Finance Initiative (PFI) - A method of procuring a service from a private sector partner for a given period of time, in exchange for annual payments, in place of buying an asset now. The capital investment in assets is undertaken by the private sector partner rather than the authority.

                        RSL – Registered Social Landlord - A social housing organisation that is registered with the Housing Corporation.

                        Regional Spatial Strategy – Statutory planning document setting out policies for the development and use of land in a region.

                        Rent restructuring - a new formula for rent setting that will bring council rents and housing association rents in line. Rents will be based on the property size, location and condition of your home.

                        RTB - Right to Buy - The right of Council Tenants to buy their home (after five years as a tenant) at a discount.

                        Ringfencing – to ensure finance can only be applied to a particular area, item or activity.

                        SAP - Standard Assessment Procedure; Energy Efficiency ratings, in new dwellings

                        Section 106 – Section 106 of the Town and Country Planning Act 1990 allows for agreements between landowners/developers and local authorities, e.g. for social facilities or affordable housing to be included within or contributed through the development of a site.

                        SIG – Special Interest Group.

                        Stock Transfer - The transfer of a Local Authority’s entire Housing Stock to one or more RSLs.

                        Stakeholders – the individuals and groups of people with an interest in a given subject. In the case of housing stakeholders are usually tenants, leaseholders, Council members and staff but also includes contractors, voluntary agencies and other local authorities.

                        Supporting People - The Supporting People programme provides housing related support services.

                        Tenant Compact - The agreements which authorities are required to enter into with bodies representing tenants and leaseholders on how they will be fully involved in the running of the housing service.

                        TMV – Tenanted market valuation.

                        TPO – Tenant Participation Officer.

                        Webcammed – Device to allow people to participate via the Internet.

                        Zone Agents – The organisation that is responsible for the co-ordination of the Key Worker Living and Homebuy scheme in a given area.


                        Further information

                        For further information on the Council’s Options Appraisal, please visit www.waverley.gov.uk/housingoptions

                        Further information regarding the stock condition survey can be accessed by contacting the Asset and Information Manager on 01483 523129.

                        Appendix Two Needs Analysis

                        Applicants on the Housing Register

                        2001/22002/32003/42004/52005/6
                        General need applicants on register11201252143615751651
                        WBC Transfer443456471
                        Housing Association Transfer131123130
                        Accepted Homeless Applicants14813713310453

                        Tenure of accommodation required by concealed households – 2001 Housing Needs Survey Type and size of accommodation required by concealed households – 2001 Housing Needs Survey
                        Type1 bed2 bed3 bed4 bed
                        Semi detached
                        46
                        207
                        56
                        0
                        Flat/maisonette
                        610
                        392
                        0
                        0
                        Bedsit
                        42
                        0
                        0
                        0
                        Terraced
                        2
                        166
                        0
                        5
                        Detached
                        0
                        3
                        6
                        0
                        Bungalow
                        0
                        11
                        0
                        0
                        The location of accommodation required by concealed households - 2001 Housing Needs Survey
                        LocationNumber
                        Anywhere in the Borough
                        492
                        Godalming
                        376
                        Cranleigh
                        282
                        In village where they currently live
                        269
                        Farnham
                        249
                        Haslemere
                        152
                        Farncombe
                        127
                        In another village
                        97
                        Tenure of households Waverley and England

                        2003 data on tenure
                        All householdsOwnedOwned shared ownershipSocial rentedPrivate rentedLiving rent free
                        Waverley
                        47,176
                        35,728
                        345
                        6,141
                        3,8371,125
                        % of total
                        75.73
                        0.73
                        13.02
                        8.132.38
                        England
                        20,451,427
                        13,920,429
                        133,693
                        3,940,728
                        2,037,470419,107
                        % of total
                        68.06
                        0.65
                        19.27
                        9.962.05
                        Lettings of Waverley Borough Council properties

                        Appendix Three Private Sector Renewal

                        Loan Finance

                        Housing in Waverley is very expensive and therefore many occupiers may have considerable equity even though they may have little disposable income. The Council promotes the Houseproud Scheme, which is run by the Housing Improvement Trust (HIT). The scheme raises low-cost loans from commercial lenders secured against the value of the property and the package includes free financial advice and a guarantee of no repossession. The scheme aims to assist people who are aged 60 or over or are disabled and who are unable to raise a loan through other means. The loans are aimed at repairing and improving homes in order to reduce the number of properties in poor repair or unfit for occupation. The amount of loan ranges from £3,000.00 to £30,000.00. Houseproud loans are also available to top-up mandatory Disabled Facilities Grants, e.g. for extensions to provide ground floor bedrooms (such works typically cost more than £35,000.00 in Waverley) and to provide energy efficiency measures.

                        Home Improvement Grant

                        This is available to home-owners who are unable to obtain a Houseproud loan, e.g. where the works cost less than £3,000.00, there is insufficient equity in the property against which to secure a loan, the client is under 60 and not disabled or where the client is refused a loan because of bankruptcy or they cannot afford the repayments. The eligible works are the same as for the Houseproud loan up to a maximum of £5,000.00 and the grant is available to anyone who is below the income tax threshold or who claims an income-related benefit. The grant is also available for minor disabled adaptations, including discretionary works, home security measures and sound insulation.

                        Equity Sharing

                        This scheme is available where the cost of the works is more than £5,000.00 and the home-owner is unable to obtain a Houseproud loan, e.g. because they are under 60 years old or they have been refused a loan because of bankruptcy or they cannot afford the repayments. Under this scheme, the Council will fund the works up to a maximum of £30,000.00 in return for a share of the equity of the property proportionate with the cost of the works compared to the value of the property prior to the works being carried out. Applicants need to demonstrate that they have been unable to secure funding through other means. The benefit of this scheme is that the home-owner can have the works carried out without incurring debt but, when the house is sold at some time in the future, the Council will receive an appropriate amount of repayment, which will be available to use again for the benefit of other people in the same position. The eligible works under this scheme are to repair and improve homes as well as meeting the occupiers’ wishes and aspirations as under the Houseproud Scheme. It is also available to owners of properties who wish to make that property available to people in housing need and can include works to empty properties and conversions of large properties into flats or other types of accommodation for which there is a need.

                        Advice and Information

                        In addition to the financial and other assistance identified above, Waverley Council is committed to providing advice, information and technical support in order to assist residents. The following services are provided, either directly or through partner agencies:
                        · Information pamphlets on the range of grants and loans provided by Waverley Borough Council to improve private sector renewal
                        · Information booklets on the range of services provided by the Waverley Care & Repair Agency
                        · Lists of approved contractors for improvements or disabled adaptations
                        · Promotion of the Energy Care Network and Warm Front scheme for home energy improvements
                        · Promotion of the local handyman service for minor repairs
                        · Site visits to identify housing defects and recommend works of improvement.

                        Review of Policy

                        Spending on housing renewals during 2004/05 dropped considerably compared with previous years. In 2003/04 42-renovation/home improvement grants were completed at a cost of £230,000. The following year only 27 grants were completed at a cost of £112,000. At the same time there has been no take-up of equity release loans or the equity share scheme. There has been a marked resistance by home-owners in Waverley to giving up part of the equity of their properties in order to pay for repairs and improvements. With renovation grants no longer available, the only uptake of assistance has been for the Waverley Home Improvement Grant for works costing no more than £5000.

                        In view of the low uptake of elements of the Home Improvement Policy and in recognition of the results of the BRE project and the target for the Decent Homes Standard in the private sector, Waverley Council intends to overhaul the Home Improvement Policy. It is hoped that the revised policy will commence in April 2006 and will focus on areas of highest need with a more accessible approach.

                        Care & Repair Agency

                        An unfortunate drawback of living in an affluent area like Waverley is that work is plentiful for tradesmen such as carpenters, plumbers and electricians. Consequently it can be difficult and costly to obtain their services, particularly for smaller jobs. The district has a relatively high and increasing proportion of elderly households, 22%of the population are aged 60 or over, whose houses are generally found to be in worse condition than the norm and who require assistance to adapt their homes as the householders become less physically able.

                        In 1999 the Council and its partners established a Home Improvement Agency (known as ‘Waverley Care and Repair’) to help meet the needs of elderly or disabled or vulnerable owner-occupiers or private tenants who need assistance. Funding for the agency comes partly from the Department for Communities and Local Government (formerly ODPM) and from Surrey County Council, and the remainder of the income is collected by way of fees. The fee income increased by almost 100% in 2002/03 over the previous year and remains at this level, and the number of cases with all works completed increased by 60% on the previous year.

                        The service assists grant applicants with completing forms, preparing work specifications, obtaining planning permission and building regulations approval, obtaining contractors’ estimates, supervising the works and certifying payments. The agency is able to help arrange essential repairs or adaptations even in cases where the applicant is not financially eligible for a grant but requires help because of frailty or disability. The Department for Communities and Local Government sets a ‘social priority’ target, that 80% of clients must be elderly, disabled or on a low income. Waverley Care and Repair more than meets this target with 100%.

                        During 2003/04 the Agency completed 34 cases with a value of works of £229,000. In 2004/5 the Agency completed 35 cases with a value of works of £171,000. Since April 2003 the Agency has been able to increase staffing levels with an additional member of staff for three days per week using additional funding from the Guildford and Waverley Primary Care Trust. . Approximately 75% of the cases handled last year (2004/05) were for disabled clients and this proportion is expected to increase as the Agency targets its efforts more towards the disabled sector.

                        Appendix Four Strategic Housing and Enabling 2006/7 Service Plans

                        This Service Plan is in two parts, the first covers Housing Needs and the second Housing Enabling

                        1. HOUSING NEEDS
                        PRINCIPAL SERVICES
                        Housing Needs Section:

                        Maintaining the Housing Needs Register, allocation of Council properties in accordance with Council's allocation policy, nominating households to housing association vacancies, providing independent housing advice and help in preventing homelessness, helping those in housing need access accommodation in the private sector through use of rent deposit bond/cash/rent in advance schemes, fulfilling the Council's statutory homelessness duty in assessing homeless applications and arranging suitable accommodation as appropriate, allocation and management of temporary accommodation, maintaining records and databases to provide information on housing need in the borough and performance information to the Council and Central Government, providing an outreach and support service to victims of domestic violence and help develop such services.

                        SERVICE AIMS AND OBJECTIVES
                        The service links to the Corporate aims and objectives 2005 and beyond in:
                        Promoting Social Inclusion (8), Optimising benefit from management of the Council’s assets (31), Provide effective and efficient support to tenants (23), Support the Homeless (24), Minimise the use of bed and breakfast (25), Protect public health and safety (19), Reduce fear of crime (21), Improve opportunities for young people (5), Improve opportunities for people with disabilities (7), Present key performance & financial information in a clear and engaging way (12).

                        Other relevant strategies/plans:
                        Homelessness Strategy, Community Strategy, Housing Strategy, Regional Housing Strategy, Sustainable Communities: Building for the Future

                        Central Government priorities:
                        Prevention of Homelessness, Promoting Social Inclusion, Reduce use of temporary accommodation by 50% by 2010, ending use of B&B for families, Reducing instances of homelessness against main causes, promoting customer choice, Introduce Choice Based Lettings by 2010, Reducing instances of Rough Sleeping, Reducing repeat homelessness

                        Service Achievements 05/06 April -October.
                        Significant reduction in number of homeless applications and homeless acceptances compared with same period last year. Achieved by effective homelessness prevention through housing advice and helping people access private rented accommodation through the Council's rent deposit schemes.
                        Involvement in a partnership bid with Guildford, Rushmoor and Hart Council's for additional Government funding to help introduce Choice Based Lettings. Outcome of bid will be known November - December 2005.
                        Continuing to meeting the Government's B&B target even though a large unit of temporary accommodation is undergoing major refurbishment.
                        Amendments to Council's Allocation Policy and Points scheme recently implemented.

                        ACTION PLAN TO DELIVER THE SERVICE IN 2006/07
                        Action/AimSteps to be takenResource implicationsTimescalesMeasures & MilestonesRisks IdentifiedReliant onLead OfficerRef to CPA Imp Plan
                        Housing Advice: Develop and enhance Housing Advice Service to continue good work in preventing homelessnessReconfigure housing advice and homelessness service to produce an additional post within Housing Advice.No additional resource but changing a job role when it becomes vacant.February 06- May 06Feb 06 - Potential post becoming vacant, secure approval to re-designate, March 06 Advertise post April 06 interview/appoint to role. Not securing approval for re-designation of the roleDependent on a particular post in the homelessness section becoming vacant through retirement.Mike Rivers (Housing Needs Manager)
                        Homelessness:

                        Reducing use of temporary accommodation and reducing length of stay in temporary accommodation

                        Homelessness section to work in close co-operation with Housing advice section to continue to achieve reduced numbers of households having to be assisted under emergency Homelessness legislation.

                        As reductions occur and when refurbished hostel at cedar lodge becomes available, reduce stock of more costly leased properties.

                        Continued funding of rent deposits rent in advance etc to help access private sector accommodationOngoingRefurbished hostel due back April-May 2006Delay in Cedar lodge handback, Increased numbers of homeless applications coupled with reduced availability of private rented stockReconfiguration of service so a homelessness officer post becomes an housing advice post

                        Continued flexible use of B&B budget and receipt of Department for Communities and Local Government grant to fund deposits

                        Eileen Bailey (Deputy Homelessness Manager) Elizabeth Donaldson (Senior Housing Advisory Officer)
                        Housing Needs: Introduce Choice based Lettings (CBL)Devise simpler allocation policy, Consultation with Customers and Stakeholders, Secure member approval and budget approval, Choose and install new IT systemCapital funding for set up/IT costs, project management costs, consultation costs etc

                        Revenue funding for ongoing service costs, advertising etc. Most CBL schemes are considered to increase customer satisfaction but do require additional resources to cope with increased demand /expectations.

                        Dec 05 - Mar 07Nov-Dec 05 Outcome of Department for Communities and Local Government bid known for sub regional scheme.

                        Jan -June 06 produce revised policy, consult with applicants, stakeholders, secure member approval

                        June 06 - Mar 07 implement new system.

                        Not receiving Department for Communities and Local Government grant and NO vote re stock transfer - impact of budget capacityCBL is required irrespective of Stock transfer and receipt of Department for Communities and Local Government grant but its introduction would be considerably eased with a yes vote and receipt of grantMike Rivers (Housing Needs Manager) Julie Grozier (Deputy Housing Needs Manager)

                        To offer a quality support and outreach service to victims of domestic abuse/violence

                        Note: At time of writing this service is subject to a possible merger with Guildford service and being run by a different organisation

                        To ensure continued funding of 2nd Outreach workerFunding is provided through Safer Waverley. Dependent on continued grants being paid by partnersApr 06-Mar 07November 2005 - Decision on future merger.

                        Nov 05 - Mar 06 Decision by Safer Waverley as to whether funding available for continuation of Outreach post.

                        Safer Waverley Partners not able to contribute same levels of funding as previouslyFunding available to be committed to DV by Partners of Safer WaverleyMike Rivers (Housing Needs Manager) Annette Marshall (Senior Domestic Violence Outreach Worker)
                        Housing Needs Section as a whole:

                        Re-configure service in event of a Yes vote re Stock transfer

                        Finalise what areas of work and posts will move to Weyfold Community Homes, assess impact on retained services-resilience issues etc, Reconfigure services appropriately, Agree service level agreements with WeyfoldIn event of a yes vote likely to be considerable staff time in achieving a smooth transition and revise ways of delivering a service. Retained Housing Service, depending on how many staff transfer, may require additional staffing to off set lost economies of scale of being part of a large housing sectionDec-05 - Mar-07Dec 05 Outcome of Vote

                        Jan - June 06 Agree revised staffing structure and SLA with Weyfold

                        No vote for Stock transferYes vote for stock transfer and maintaining staff co-operation in decisions that result from the transferMike Rivers (housing needs manager)
                        HOW THE SERVICE PERFORMS
                        Indicator 2004/52005/06 First 6 months
                        LOH30Proportion of homelessness decisions made within 33 working days98%94%
                        BVPI212Average relet time for Local Authority propertiesNA (New BVPI)36.79 days
                        No RefAverage time from when void property is available for letting to actual tenancy commencement date12 days21 days
                        BVPI183Average length of stay for households which include dependent children or a pregnant woman, in B&B and HostelsB&B 3 weeks Hostels 51 weeksB&B 4 weeks Hostels 50 weeks
                        BVPI203 (new for 04/05)% change in average number of families which include dependent children or a pregnant woman, placed in temporary accommodation under the homelessness legislation compared with previous year-23.5%Minus 17% (80 households)
                        BVPI202 (new for 04/05)Number of people sleeping rough on a single night within the local authority area11
                        BVPI213Number of households who considered themselves as homeless, who approached the local housing authority’s housing advice service(s), and for whom housing advice casework intervention resolved their situation.NA (New BVPI)0.11% (51 cases)
                        BVPI214Proportion of households accepted as statutorily homeless who were accepted as statutorily homeless by the same Authority within the last two years.NA (new BVPI)0%

                        SERVICE DEVELOPMENTS
                        Service development outlined above - reconfigure service to produce additional housing advisor, reconfigure service in event of stock transfer / CBL, Introduce CBL, Ensure continued resourcing for DV outreach.


                        2. HOUSING ENABLING

                        PRINCIPAL SERVICES
                        The Housing Strategy and Enabling Team work with housing associations and developers to support the provision of new affordable housing, which goes towards meeting local housing need. In order to carry out this role, the Team also work closely across Council sections, including Housing, Planning, Finance, Environment and Leisure and Legal Services as well as external organisations such as the Housing Corporation and the Government Office for the South East.
                        The team also undertakes research into local housing needs, co-ordinates production and implementation of the Housing Strategy and other related policies and plans designed to tackle housing problems in the borough.
                        More information about the work of the section can be found on our website

                        SERVICE AIM AND OBJECTIVES
                        AIM
                        Working with our housing association partners, Parish Councils, developers and local residents to facilitate the development of affordable housing
                        OBJECTIVES
                        · To assist in identifying local housing need
                        · To maximise opportunities for the development of affordable housing
                        · To work with partners to secure funding for future provision
                        · To developing affordable housing for those in housing need
                        · To work to achieve balanced communities within the borough
                        · To make most effective use of housing stock across Waverley
                        · To monitor performance and delivery of housing providers

                        WHAT DID WE ACHIEVE IN 2005/06?
                        · Completion of eleven shared ownership homes at Haslemere in partnership with Thames Valley Housing Association
                        · Completion of three homes for shared ownership and four rented homes at Hindhead, in partnership with Thames Valley Housing Association
                        · Completion of twelve homes for shared ownership for keyworkers and nine rented homes at Wormley, in partnership with Sentinel Housing Group.
                        · Twelve households have completed purchases of using assistance from Waverley Borough Council's Do It Yourself Shared Ownership scheme (DIYSO)
                        · Completion of eight affordable homes, facilitated by the Homebuy loan scheme
                        · Sixteen Key Workers employed in the borough have been assisted to purchase a property using Key Worker Living Initiative
                        · Completion of ten homes for shared ownership and thirteen rented homes completed during the first phase of development at Cranleigh, in partnership with Downland Housing Association. The scheme is an exception to planning policy, which will provide a total of seventy-nine affordable homes for local people and is due for final completion in the summer of 2006

                        · Work at Elstead to provide five homes for shared ownership and thirteen rented homes has started on site, in partnership with Thames Valley Housing Association
                        · Work at Farnham to provide two shared ownership homes for keyworkers and five general needs rented homes has started on site, in partnership with Pavilion Housing Group
                        · Work at Godalming to provide five shared ownership homes and three rented homes has started on site, in partnership with Mount Green Housing Association
                        · Future development of affordable housing will include some of the eighty eight affordable units which already have planning permission and one hundred and sixty nine homes which are at an early discussion stage
                        · A Housing Strategy and Enabling Officer has been appointed, with a worker in post as of May 2005
                        · A mail out to all empty properties was carried out, in partnership with Council Tax April 2005
                        · Housing Strategy Conference September 2005
                        · Completion of the 2005-2010 Housing Strategy Statement, which has achieved Fit for Purpose Status

                        ACTION PLAN TO DELIVER THE SERVICE IN 2006/07
                        ActionSteps to be takenResource implicationsTime-scalesMeasures & MilestonesRisks identifiedReliant onPerson Responsible
                        Facilitate the provision of good quality local housingProgress development of affordable housing which includes a mix of general needs and key worker homes for rent and HomeBuy productsAllocation from Regional Housing Board
                        Within existing resources
                        2006Completion of units at
                        Cranleigh
                        Elstead
                        Farnham
                        Milford
                        Monitored via
                        RSL liaison meetings
                        RSL quarterly forum
                        Site meetings
                        If allocation is lower than previous years due to prioritisation of growth areas in Regional Housing StrategyStrong development programme from RSL's, support from Housing CorporationRSL’s
                        Housing Strategy and Enabling Manager
                        Disposal of land, where appropriate on individual site basisSubmit planning application to develop scheme on WBC land£30,000 consultancy fees to submit planning application2007Consultants appointed to produce application
                        Submit for planning approval December 2006
                        Delay or refusal for permissionSuccessful planning applicationHousing Strategy and Enabling Manager
                        Support 1 rural housing scheme per year3 homes at Elstead to start on site, in partnership with English Rural Housing Association (ERHA)Allocation from Regional Housing Board for 2004-62006Section 106 agreement in negotiation September 2005Delays in development processOngoing work with ERHAERHA
                        Housing Strategy and Enabling Manager
                        Increasing supply of affordable housingFeed into the Local Development Framework and Housing Development Plan Documents to reflect need for and ensure commitment to affordable housingWithin existing staff resources2006Ongoing work with planning department
                        Policy on commuted sum and policy for negotiating affordable housing without grant funding to be included
                        Timescale changes in production of Government GuidanceOngoing work with Planning OfficersHousing Strategy and Enabling Manager
                        Principal Planner

                        Housing Strategy and Enabling Manager
                        Principal Planner
                        Work with planners, landowners and developers to ensure affordable housing requirements in current Local Plan and future LDF are met and exceeded where possibleWithin existing staff resources2006Ongoing joint housing and planning negotiations with developers on s.106 sites
                        Affordable housing requirements to be reviewed as part of LDF
                        If schemes do not obtain planning permission or secure subsidyAvailability of land and fundingPrincipal Planner
                        Housing Strategy and Enabling Manager
                        Maximise opportunities for the development of affordable housingMonitor level of empty homes and take appropriate actionWithin existing staff resourcesOngoingBest value performance indicators, Housing Strategy Statistical Appendix and Service PlansRelatively low number of empty homes in the borough, compared to national average. Properties empty due to affluence rather than deprivationHome owners who wish to bring their empty home back into useHousing Strategy and Enabling Manager
                        Team Leader (Housing) E&L
                        Understanding Housing NeedFull housing needs survey£40,000 of existing resources2006/7Full housing needs survey 2001, updated in 2003 and 2005Re-considering allocation of resources if stock transfer does not go aheadAllocating resources in 2006/7 budgetHousing Strategy and Enabling Manager
                        Maximise opportunities for the development of affordable housingHold affordable housing conference for developers£1,000 from existing resourcesNovember 2006Conference for RSL’s and developers held March 2005Re-considering allocation of resources if stock transfer does not go aheadStaff time and resources to support eventHousing Strategy and Enabling Manager

                        Meeting decent homes standard in other social housingMonitoring and encouraging RSL’s to meet Decent Homes StandardWithin existing resourcesOngoingAnnual reports from Housing Association.
                        Mapping exercise carried out 2004
                        Resources to supportResponse rateHousing Strategy and Enabling Manager
                        Preventing homelessnessExplore potential of developing a year round hostel for vulnerable homeless peopleCash sum
                        Regional housing board/ housing corporation
                        Amount dependent on site
                        OngoingNeed for hostel for single people still evident. Ongoing work underway to investigate cost, find suitable site and secure fundingResources to supportAllocation from Regional Housing BoardHousing Needs Manager
                        Housing Strategy and Enabling Manager
                        Preventing HomelessnessContinue to identify suitable WBC land, which can be used to facilitate the development of supported accommodationWithin existing staff resourcesWithin existing staff resourcesOngoingOngoing work with providers of housing and support servicesLand and resources to supportHousing Strategy and Enabling Manager
                        RSL’s
                        SERVICE DEVELOPMENTS
                        Local house prices in Waverley are significantly above the average for the South East region, making it more difficult to access good quality, affordable housing. For example the average cost of a home in the Surrey is £312,203, with homes in the South East on average £229,083, whereas a terraced house is Waverley is £341,671.
                        House prices have risen across all properties types since 2000 by an average of 37%. Taking the average price for a flat, the income required is £37,000. According to the 2005 housing needs survey update more than 75% of existing households have an income below this level. Access to the market is clearly dependent on availability, a factor that is particularly critical for low-income households who can only enter the market where there is an adequate supply of affordable homes. Findings from the Housing Needs Survey indicate that over 90% of concealed households have an income of less than £30,000. As a result, the vast majority of concealed households are unable to afford to purchase a property on the open market. Private rented accommodation was not a popular choice amongst concealed households and high rent levels mean that less than half of those who expressed a preference for private rented accommodation could actually afford it.
                        Our partners in the statutory, voluntary and private sector regularly tell us in consultation exercises, that the availability of affordable housing is an issue. As an employer, Waverley knows how difficult it can be to recruit staff because of the high housing costs in this part of the country. Consequently the provision of affordable housing is a high corporate priority, has been highlighted as an area of concern by the Local Strategic Partnership in the Waverley Community Strategy and has been ranked as the highest priority for this housing strategy,
                        An update to the Housing Needs Survey (carried out in 2005) concluded a yearly household income of £37,000 is required to purchase an average priced flat in the area is. 75% of local households earn less than this amount. The Council’s Housing Needs register held 2,304 applications as at 15.3.06. Right to Buy has depleted the Council’s stock and ability to re-house people in housing need. Furthermore, private rented accommodation at an affordable level is in short supply. The 2005 update to the Housing Needs Survey estimated an annual shortfall of 622 affordable units every year. Therefore, facilitating the provision of affordable housing in Waverley is a high corporate priority.
                        Not only should people be able to access affordable housing, but also that housing should be of a good standard; regardless of tenure. The Council believes that every tenant deserves to live in a decent home. A decent home is at the heart of a sustainable community. The Government is challenging local authorities to meet the Decent Homes Standard in public housing by 2010. Waverley faces a number of challenges, which makes meeting the Decent Homes Standard a key priority. 53% of all the council housing does not currently meet the Decent Homes Standard. Following a rigorous Options Appraisal in 2004 the Council then balloted its tenants on whether or not the stock should be transferred to a newly-created RSL in order to take advantage of the financial freedoms that would have been enabled the DHS to have been exceeded. Tenants voted against this proposal and the Council now faces the difficult task of attempting to meet the Government deadline with extremely restricted resources whilst still delivering a good quality service to its tenants. The Council will not be able to meet the DHS target by 2010.
                        Within the private sector we have to rise to the government's challenge of ensuring that by 2010 70% of vulnerable owner-occupiers have a decent home. It is estimated that 30% of the private sector stock in Waverley is non-decent and that 2,211 households are occupied by vulnerable households. This clearly is an issue that Waverley needs to address. Additionally, while relatively small in numbers, Houses in Multiple Occupation need to be individually inspected in order to ensure that they meet the mandatory licensing requirements.

                        Appendix Five Affordable Housing Needs Assessment Model

                        1. Households in unsuitable housing needing to move
                        6.402
                        2. MINUS Council – RSL /tenants
                        1,708
                        3. Cases where in-situ solution most appropriate
                        1,889
                        3,597
                        3,597
                        2,805
                        4. TIMES – Proportion unable to afford to buy or rent
                        35%
                        982
                        5. PLUS – Backlog (non-households)
                        3
                        6. TOTAL BACKLOG NEED
                        985
                        7. TIMES – Quota to progressively reduce backlog
                        20%
                        8. ANNUAL NEED TO REDUCE BACKLOG
                        197
                        Newly Arising Need:
                        9. New household formation (gross p.a.)
                        491
                        10. MINUS – Two person formation (22%) x 0.5
                        54
                        437
                        11. MINUS – Households registered on waiting list (17)
                        74
                        363
                        363
                        12. TIMES – Proportion unable to buy (94%) or rent (82%) in market
                        (82%)
                        298
                        13. PLUS – Ex-institutional population moving into community
                        2
                        14. Existing households falling into priority need
                        340
                        15. In-migrant households unable to afford market housing
                        4
                        16. TOTAL NEWLY ARISING NEED
                        644
                        Supply of Affordable units
                        17. Supply of social re-lets p.a.
                        221
                        18. MINUS – Increased vacancies (if applicable) and units taken out of management. Right to Buy/Demolition
                        (68 x 3.3%)
                        2
                        219
                        19. PLUS – Committed units of new affordable supply (not able to predict
                        0
                        20. AFFORDABLE SUPPLY
                        219
                        Annual need to reduce backlog
                        197
                        Newly arising need
                        644
                        21. TOTAL AFFORDABLE NEED
                        841
                        841
                        MINUS – Affordable supply
                        219
                        22. OVERALL ANNUAL SHORTFALL
                        622

                        Appendix Six Home Improvement Policy

                        Introduction

                        1. Under the terms of The Regulatory Reform (Housing Assistance)(England and Wales) Order 2002 the Council is empowered to provide assistance in any form to enable any person:

                        Ø To acquire living accommodation (whether within or outside the Borough);
                        Ø To enlarge or improve living accommodation (whether by alteration, conversion, enlargement etc.);
                        Ø To repair living accommodation
                        Ø To demolish buildings comprising or including living accommodation;
                        Ø Where buildings including living accommodation have been demolished, to construct replacement living accommodation.

                        This assistance may be given in any form.

                        2. In order to use these powers, the Council has to produce a Policy, which is to be published and be available for inspection. The powers must be exercised in accordance with the published policy.

                        3. This policy document details the Council’s strategic objectives in the use of the powers and the way in which assistance is to be provided in order to meet those objectives.

                        Objectives

                        4. In establishing the objectives for this policy, the Council has taken into account the following strategic objectives:
                        o Home Energy Conservation Act (HECA) strategy and Fuel Poverty strategy;
                        o Local Agenda 21
                        o Crime and Disorder strategy
                        o Housing Strategy

                        o Increasing the supply of affordable accommodation;
                        o Reducing under-occupation

                        5. Taking into account the condition of private sector housing in the Waverley Borough Council area and the information and strategies mentioned above, the Council wishes to:

                        a. enable owner-occupiers of dwellings which are unfit for human habitation to make their homes fit and with a future life of at least five years for the major structural elements;
                        b. enable owner-occupiers to carry out improvements and repairs to their homes in order to prevent those dwellings from becoming unfit;
                        c. enable private sector tenants to carry out necessary improvements to their homes but which are not the duty of the landlord to undertake;
                        d. enable owner-occupiers and private sector tenants to make their homes energy efficient and secure against crime;
                        e. enable owners of empty properties to make them available for letting to people in housing need;
                        f. enable people to move from homes which are too large for them or otherwise do not meet their needs, or to convert their homes into smaller accommodation units which meet their needs better and provide accommodation to other people in housing need;
                        g. support home owners and private sector tenants in carrying out necessary improvements to their homes within the context of the Council’s wider strategic objectives to improve quality of life, health and the environment;
                        h. enable key workers to gain access to housing in the Borough;
                        i. to contribute to the Decent Home Standard.

                        Assistance to be provided

                        6. The Council is of the opinion that it is the responsibility of owners of property to maintain and improve them as necessary at their own expense, however, it also recognises that this may be difficult for some people. In order to assist people, the Council will:

                        a. support residents in securing loan finance to carry out necessary works;
                        b. subject to conditions and where loan finance is not available, provide grants to owner-occupiers and tenants for carrying out works;
                        c. in appropriate cases, provide funding for necessary works in return for an appropriate proportion of the equity of the property;
                        d. provide guidance to residents on how to obtain appropriate financial advice in order to secure funding, how to obtain reliable contractors and how to arrange for works to be carried out;
                        e. provide support to owners in preparing specifications, obtaining contractors’ estimates, securing loans or grants and supervising works on site.
                        f. arrange special projects and schemes to support Waverley strategies and priorities. This may include negotiating with contractors to offer special packages of measures, which can be offered to residents at special competitive rates.

                        Assistance into Action

                        7. The Council has only limited capital funding for home improvements and is therefore only able to assist a small proportion of householders who need assistance. Furthermore, many residents did not qualify for assistance under the old grants scheme because of their financial circumstances although they still needed to have works done but were unable or unwilling to do so for various reasons. Using the forms of assistance outlined above and detailed below, Waverley intends to make better use of the funding it has available and also to free up private funding in an effective and sympathetic way so that many more homes in the Borough may be improved each year.

                        8. Each of the areas of assistance as listed above is based on meeting the needs of residents and the strategic objectives of the Council and needs specific detailed provisions and arrangements as follows:


                        i. Housing in Waverley is very expensive and therefore many occupiers, especially those who have lived in the area for a long time, may have considerable equity even if they have very little disposable income. It is reasonable for owners of such property to use that equity to improve their homes. Resistance to taking loans is common, especially amongst older people. This is typically because of a fear about being in debt, fear of re-possession and a reluctance to reduce the amount they are able to leave to others.

                        ii. The Council intends to work in partnership with other local authorities in London and the South East to support the House Proud scheme being promoted by the Housing Improvement Trust (HIT). HIT is a ‘not for profit’ registered company established with support from the Special Grants Programme of the former DETR to help arrange funding of property improvements, repairs and adaptations. The scheme raises low-cost loans from commercial lenders and the package includes free financial advice and a guarantee of no re-possession. HIT tries to work with the whole family, not just the house owner; this tends to reduce the applicants’ worries and, in some cases, ends up with the family funding the works rather than the householder taking on a mortgage. This scheme would assist those people who are aged 60 or over or are disabled.

                        iii. Those who do not qualify for the House Proud scheme will be provided with advice about securing a further advance on an existing mortgage or how to raise a new loan.

                        iv. The Council will also explore other avenues for loan finance and will review any new or existing schemes aimed at helping low income households to repair or improve their homes.

                        v. It is not proposed that the Council will itself provide loans for eligible work. It is also important that Waverley does not expose itself to liability resulting from individuals taking out inappropriate financial products offered by the private sector or by HIT. For this reason, the Council will guide applicants towards independent financial advisors and will not provide financial advice itself.

                        vi. Such loans, which are facilitated by the Council, will be aimed at improving and repairing homes as well as meeting the occupiers’ wishes and aspirations. The key outcomes will be the making fit of unfit properties and the reduction in the number of properties in poor repair. Over a period of time there should be a measurable reduction in the number of unfit dwellings in the Borough. § Where there is insufficient equity in the property against which to raise a secured loan or mortgage
                        § Where the amount required is too small to justify raising a secured loan or mortgage
                        § Where the Benefits Agency is unwilling to pay the interest costs
                        § Where the client cannot afford the repayments
                        § Where the client is refused a loan because of bankruptcy or other reasons
                        § If the house changes ownership within 10 years from the certified date of completion, the grant will be repaid in full;
                        § If the property ceases to be owner-occupied or tenanted as the case may be, within 10 years from the certified date of completion, the grant will be re-paid in full;
                        § These conditions will be a charge on the property;
                        § No grant application will be considered within three years following completion of works under a previous grant paid under this policy.

                        9. Mandatory Disabled Facilities Grants (DFGs) are not directly affected by the Order except that discretionary DFGs are no longer available. Discretionary DFGs were available for works costing in excess of the mandatory maximum and for non-mandatory works which would be of benefit to the disabled person e.g. to provide facilities for employment at home. Applicants for DFGs will be eligible for assistance under this new scheme in order to raise funding for their contribution to the cost of adaptations or where the works cost in excess of the maximum permitted DFG, currently £25,000 .

                        10. Waverley Borough Council will commit capital resources to housing renovation every year as part of its Housing Capital Programme. For the year 2003/04 the proposed sum in the draft Housing Capital Programme will be £205,000 for private sector housing renewals and £165,000 for DFGs.

                        11. Waverley will maintain current staffing in the Environmental Health section to process applications and determine what works are appropriate for Council support. In addition to this, Waverley will continue to provide the Care and Repair service with the support of Surrey County Council and the Department for Communities and Local Government (formerly ODPM) provided these funding streams remain in place. From April 2003 the core funding from the Department for Communities and Local Government for home improvement agencies will come through the Supporting People programme via Surrey County Council. The Council will seek ways of securing long-term funding for this service and, if resources can be identified, expand the service to provide support for more people who need it.

                        12. This is a new piece of legislation and, whilst it replaces an existing regime, it will offer more flexibility and discretion to the Council. The impact on demand is not clear at this stage and will be kept under review, but there is clearly scope for there to be an increase in demands both on revenue and capital resources. The 2001 census has highlighted changing local demography with a significant increase in the numbers of elderly people. This change is also likely to cause increasing demands on the resources for home improvement and adaptation

                        Access to Assistance

                        12. Each client needs individual support tailored to his or her needs. Since that person is unlikely to be completely clear what assistance may be available, it is important that access is easy and through a limited number of points. The lead section in Waverley Borough Council will continue to be the Environmental Health section of the Environment and Leisure Department. This section includes the Care and Repair service. People seeking assistance, either directly or via other people or agencies, will all access the service by contacting the Environmental Health section.

                        13. Information on support that is available will be provided to other agencies including Citizens Advice Bureaux, Age Concern Waverley, Surrey County Council and the Guildford and Waverley Primary Care Trust.

                        14. The services will be publicised, including contact details, in the Link magazine, the local press and the Waverley website as well as in all Waverley Council offices.

                        15. All potential clients of the service will be sent details which are clear, unambiguous and in plain English. They will be invited to complete a simple questionnaire but, if they have difficulty with completing such a questionnaire, they will be invited to telephone for assistance. The information and the questionnaire will also be available on the Waverley website. In all cases where it appears that Waverley will be able to provide assistance, it will then be necessary to arrange a personal visit to the client’s home.

                        16. Where loans are sought, these will be outside of Waverley and therefore free from any conditions applied by the Council.

                        17. The grants will be subject to the conditions outlined in paragraph 8.b.ii above. All grant applicants will be informed that conditions apply, both before and at grant approval stage. The conditions will be provided in writing. Details of grants and the conditions will be recorded in the Land Charges section and the conditions will be a local land charge.

                        18. Where equity sharing is undertaken, there will be conditions relating to on-going maintenance and insurance of the dwelling and occupation of the dwelling by the person who entered into the equity sharing agreement. These conditions will also be recorded as a local land charge and occupiers may be required to provide documentary evidence as appropriate. Similarly, the Council will be entitled to inspect the property to ensure that conditions are being fulfilled.

                        19. Where people who enquire are unhappy either about this policy or about the level of service they receive under the policy, they will have the right to complain. Complaints will be in accordance with the Council’s corporate complaints procedure and details of this will be provided on request or when it is considered that this information will be of assistance to that person. Details of how to make a complaint will also be included in all of the leaflets etc. used to inform people about the services available.

                        20. It is recognised that any policy is unlikely to take account of every individual situation. Each case therefore needs to be considered on its merits and this policy used as guidance for officers. In cases where officers consider that a decision should be made outside this policy, they will be able to refer it to the Council’s Executive Committee for a decision.

                        21. Where a person considers that his or her case should be considered as an exception to the policy or where he or she considers that the policy has not been correctly applied, there will be a right of appeal to the Council’s Director of Housing (DoH) who shall consider all of the information. If the DoH considers that the case should be considered outside of this policy, s/he will refer it to the Executive Committee for a decision. Where the DoH considers that the policy has been incorrectly applied, s/he shall direct the case officer in how the case shall be determined.

                        22. Waverley Borough Council is committed to providing a high quality service within the resources available. To this end, the following key service standards will apply:

                        o All requests for service will be responded to within 14 days;
                        o All full applications for grants will be determined within 3 months of receipt subject to sufficient capital resources being available. Where such resources are not available, clients will be advised when it is expected that resources will be available and grant determinations will be made within 3 months of such resources being available;

                        23. Service standards will be agreed with any partners who are providing loans or other services in partnership with the Council.

                        24. All service standards will be included in the information provided to clients and potential clients.


                        25. The only national performance indicators that are relevant to this policy are the number of unfit properties made fit as a result of action by the Council and the improvement in energy efficiency of the housing in the Borough. These will be reported annually.

                        26. Targets
                        o A reduction of 2% in the number of unfit dwellings as a result of Council action
                        o An improvement in domestic energy efficiency of 30.4% from 1st April 1996 to 31st March 2005

                        29. The Council’s own indicators will include the following:
                            Indicator
                            Target for 2003/04
                        Performance against the published service standards95% of responses and decisions within the set service standards
                        Number of fit properties improved or repaired to prevent them becoming unfit100 properties prevented from becoming unfit
                        Capital expenditure by the CouncilCapital expenditure of £235,000 from Waverley’s own capital programme
                        Capital invested in properties from non-Waverley sources as a result of action by the Council£470,000 expenditure from other sources as a result of Waverley action
                        Number of new units of accommodation made available to those in housing need5 units of accommodation provided
                        Number of dwellings made more secure from crime10 properties made safer from the risk of crime

                        30. This policy shall come into effect on 1st April 2003.
                        31. A private sector house condition survey is to be carried out during 2003 and therefore this policy will be reviewed during 2004 and a revised policy approved and introduced by not later than 1st April 2005.
                        32. Thereafter, the policy will be reviewed every three years unless there is some event, consideration or legislative change that necessitates an earlier review. Following such a review, officers will report to both the Community Overview and Scrutiny Committee and the Executive.
                        33. Any significant changes to the policy will be publicised in accordance with the guidance issued by the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister.

                        Transitional Arrangements

                        34. The Council will consider any grant application in accordance with the old policy provided it is complete or substantially complete by not later than 31st March 2003. Any grant application which is not complete or substantially complete by 31st March 2003 will be refused.
                        35. As soon as this policy has been agreed by the Council’s Executive Committee, all applicants for grants that have not been approved will be advised of the impending changes and advised of the transitional arrangements.

                        WAVERLEY HOME IMPROVEMENT GRANT

                        SCHEDULE OF WORKS WHICH ARE ELIGIBLE FOR ASSISTANCE

                        1. Carrying out necessary works of repair where the reasonable cost (including ancillary costs) exceeds £100.
                        2. Improving energy efficiency.
                        3. Improving home security.
                        4. Improving sound insulation between dwellings.
                        5. Topping up a Disabled Facilities Grant for adaptations to a dwelling to enable a disabled person to live in the dwelling as his/her only or main residence.
                        6. Minor disabled adaptations.
                        7. Special projects as approved by the Council’s Executive Committee.

                        Comms/executive/06-07/036