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Waverley Borough Council Committee System - Committee Document

Meeting of the Executive held on 06/04/2004
Waste Reduction Strategy



Summary & Purpose
This report proposes measures to reduce the amount of household waste presented for collection across Waverley.

The national and local policy context, and legal, contractual and financial implications of adopting a Waverley Waste Reduction Strategy are described. However, the main implications of this report are environmentally positive.

Quality of Life Implications
Natural Resource Use
Pollution Prevention and Control
Biodiversity and Nature
Local Environment
Social Inclusion
Safe Communities
Local Economy
Natural
Resource Use
Pollution
Prevention and Control
Biodiversity
and Nature
Local
Environment
Social
Inclusion
Safe, Healthy
and Active
Communities
Local
Economy
Positive
Positive
Positive
Positive
Positive
Positive
Positive


APPENDIX P
WAVERLEY BOROUGH COUNCIL

EXECUTIVE – 6TH APRIL 2004

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Title:

Waste Reduction Strategy
[Wards affected: All]
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Summary and purpose:

This report proposes measures to reduce the amount of household waste presented for collection across Waverley.

The national and local policy context, and legal, contractual and financial implications of adopting a Waverley Waste Reduction Strategy are described. However, the main implications of this report are environmentally positive.

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Quality of life implications – social, environmental & economic (sustainable development):

All of the quality of life implications associated with this report are positive since an adopted waste reduction strategy would not only reduce the amount of residual waste being produced, but also increase recycling. In doing so, potential harmful impacts associated with the current methods of transporting and disposing of waste are reduced. Kerbside recycling methods also encourage members of the community to play an active and personal part in sorting their refuse for recycling.

E-Government implications:

Comprehensive information about recycling facilities are available on the Waverley website. Additionally, a search facility is available to determine day of collection for residual waste. A day-search facility for recycling collections has not yet been provided because, unlike residual waste collections, this is a fixed arrangement and not subject to the Bank Holiday roll-forward system. However, it is intended that recycling-day information will be made available on-line once service implementation has been completed. In the meantime this information will continue to be issued in leaflet form together with other comprehensive information and advice to each householder in advance of the service starting in their area.

Resource and legal implications:

There are significant financial benefits in adopting a range of formal waste reduction measures in Waverley. The costs of both collection and disposal are directly related to the quantity of waste collected. These costs are divided between Waverley as Waste Collection Authority and Surrey County Council as Disposal Authority. The rate at which a collection vehicle is filled, and the number and frequency of trips to tip are key factors in determining operational costs. This is a particularly important point in an area as large as Waverley, where the distances travelled around the Borough and to the disposal point are high.

Contractors bidding for Waverley’s new waste collection contract, due to commence in November 2005 will make a judgement about the likely future trend in quantities of household waste they will be required to collect across the Borough. It would be financially advantageous to be able to demonstrate the presence and effect of a comprehensive range of waste reduction policies.

It is estimated that the introduction of a chargeable green waste collection scheme at 60 pence per sack would generate in the region of 20,000 of income in a full year. A comprehensive report will be produced for consideration by a future meeting of the Executive.

A summary of the current legislation enabling Waste collection Authorities to charge for specified categories of waste, including garden waste, and to restrict the amount it collects is set in out in Annexe 1 to this report.



Background and Policy Context

1. One of the Council’s key objectives is to “Minimise Waste and the Use of Natural Resources”. Now that all of the kerbside rounds have been either been introduced for 21,500 new households or enhanced in the case of the 27,000 households on pre-existing rounds it is important that these recycling services be supported by a comprehensive and formally approved Waste Reduction Strategy.

2. Waverley collects more waste per household than other local authorities in its CIPFA family group at just under 1.0 tonne per household per year. The average in the group is 0.88 tonnes, whilst the lowest is found in Mid Sussex at 0.70 tonnes.

3. Reducing waste makes the achievement of the Council’s recycling targets more likely. If it were possible to reduce the amount of waste to Waverley’s family group average level of 0.88 tonnes p/household p/a, Waverley’s recycling rate would increase from the December level of almost 20% to more than 23%, even if the tonnage of recyclables collected stayed at is current level. The adoption of policies recommended in this report are likely to have a significant reduction in overall waste tonnages in Waverley.

4. Waste reduction has been placed at the top of the National Waste Hierarchy in the Government’s “Waste Strategy 2000” as the best environmental approach to waste management. These are, in descending priority order:

i. Reduce ii. Reuse iii. Recycle iv. Compost v. Disposal with energy recovery vi. Disposal to landfill
5. Waverley has most recently supported this hierarchy in its response to the consultation draft of the Surrey Joint Municipal Waste Management Strategy (Executive – 28th October 2003).

Support and Persuasion

6. Whilst the legal powers available to Waverley to reduce the amount of household waste are well-established, previous meetings of the Executive on 11th June 2002 and 9th July 2002 determined that the initial means of reducing waste and increasing participation in the Council’s recycling schemes should be by way of marketing, persuasion, education and encouragement. These measures were not to be supported by the implementation of formal waste reduction policies until after an appropriate lead-in or introductory period following-on from the introduction of recycling rounds.

Suggested Policies to Reduce Waste Volumes

7. In order to meet the Council’s own waste reduction and recycling targets it is now essential that a comprehensive set of policies are adopted. These are set out in detail in Annexe 2 to this report. All of the policies have previously been considered in detail, by the Waste Management Special Interest Group (SIG) established by the previous administration. They were also agreed in principle by the Executive in a report to it of the conclusions of the SIG on 15th January 2002. They were also subsequently agreed in principle by the Executive at its meetings on 11th June and 9th July 2002, except that it was requested that a period for encouragement, education and persuasion should be allowed following the introduction of the kerbside collection service, and that alternative means of dealing with garden waste such as home composting, rather than a chargeable system for garden waste sacks, should be promoted. 8. A local benchmarking exercise into charging for garden waste has been undertaken, with the following key findings:

    Borough
    Charge for Container
Comments
    Surrey Heath
65p per sack.50,000 sacks sold through post offices in 2003. Collected material composted.
    Elmbridge
1.00 per sack.Sold through day centres & Council offices.
Collected material landfilled.
    Guildford
30p per sack or 10 per year for reusable container.Sold through Council offices.
Collected material is composted.
    Spelthorne
No charge/no separate container for garden waste.No restriction on amount.
Landfilled with residual waste.
RunnymedeNo charge/no separate container for garden waste.Must be contained within 1 wheeled-bin. Landfilled with residual waste.
Epsom & EwellNo charge/no separate container for garden waste.Must be contained within 1 wheeled-bin. Landfilled with residual waste.
Tandridge19.37 for 25 sacks (77.5p each).Sold through contractor.
Collected material is landfilled.
Reigate & Banstead75p per sack.Currently limited to 2 sacks per household per week. Collected material is composted.
Woking1.00 per “green” sack.
    15p per sack for 6 months per year seasonal compostable garden waste service.
    Collected material is landfilled.
      Collected material is composted.
        Mole Valley
      1.00 per sackCollected material is composted.

      9. Whilst it would be possible for any garden waste separately collected by Waverley to be composted, there would be substantial collection costs associated with this. Based on the Council’s existing refuse collection/recycling contract, this would be in the region of 80,000 - 120,000 per collection-round per year depending on the type of vehicle used. The number of rounds would be dependant on the demand for the service, which is difficult to predict at this stage. In addition to this, there would be a processing charge for the garden waste collected (38.00 per tonne), but this would almost be offset by recycling-credit income at 37.67 per tonne.

      10. Other important waste reduction measures will include the promotion of “real” nappies, buying recycled goods and the prevention of junk mail.

      Public Opinion in Waverley

      11. A survey of public opinion was conducted by SSMR Ltd. in Waverley in 2001 as part of the Fundamental Service Review of Waste Management. Amongst the key findings at the time were:

      12. More recently, a survey of public opinion was undertaken across Surrey on behalf of the SLGA in connection with options being developed in connection with the Surrey Joint Municipal Waste Management Strategy. The survey was conducted by Questions Answered Ltd in December 2003 and included a sample drawn from each Surrey District. Amongst the key findings were:

      • 80% of respondents from Waverley perceived waste management to be a very serious or serious problem. This was the second highest overall rating in Surrey (82% in Mole Valley), with the average combined rating at 57% and the lowest rating recorded from Spelthorne respondents at 19%.

      • Waverley respondents were the most likely to have a home composter at 54% (lowest – 4% in Spelthorne; average - 31% across Surrey).

      • Waverley respondents gave the highest level of support to increasing reuse and recycling at 79% (lowest – 10% in Spelthorne; average 59% across Surrey).

      13. The introduction of formal waste reduction policies will need to be accompanied by a comprehensive publicity campaign aimed at producing a high level of understanding, support and community compliance. It is also recommended that an encouraging approach be taken for those who have difficulties in following any adopted polices. Any sanction should also be limited to refusal to make a collection of the specified material after at least one individual reminder has been issued.

      Conclusions

      14. Policies aimed at the reduction of waste volumes are of primary local and national importance, both environmentally and financially. Now that a comprehensive kerbside collection service has been established in Waverley, it is important that a series of formal waste reduction policies be introduced.

      15. There is a clear and important relationship between a Council’s waste reduction strategy and its recycling ambitions. Reducing residual waste volumes whilst collecting even the same amount of recyclate will increase the percentage recycling rate.

      16. These policies will need to be supported by a comprehensive publicity campaign aimed at producing a high level of understanding, support and compliance in the community.

      Recommendation

      It is recommended that the Executive:

      1. approves the detailed waste reduction policies set out in Annexe 2 to this report, commencing on 1st September 2004;

      2. agrees to garden waste contained within wheeled bins not being collected from 1st May 2005, following a further report to the Executive in which options are set out for the types of container and payment method beyond that date; and

      3. requests a further report be made to the Executive on possibilities for improving the recycling service and the rate of recycling.

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      Background Papers (DoE&L )

      Surrey Joint Waste Management Strategy; Public Opinion Survey 2003; Surrey Local Government Association.

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      CONTACT OFFICER:

      Name: Martin Shorten Telephone: 01483 869434

      E-mail: mshorten@waverley.gov.uk

      Comms/Executive/2003-04/526