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Waverley Borough Council Committee System - Committee Document

Meeting of the Executive held on 06/02/2007
ANNEXE 3



ANNEXE 3
ENVIRONMENT & LEISURE OVERVIEW AND SCRUTINY COMMITTEE

PLANNING & ENVIRONMENT – THEME 2 The Blackwater Valley Countryside Partnership coordinates and implements countryside conservation and access work along the Blackwater Valley and encourages volunteering. This is a local authority partnership project to which Waverley Borough Council has stated its commitment and support. The grant bid is based on an apportionment of costs which is calculated on the length of the Blackwater Valley within Waverley BC (5.54%).

The Blackwater Valley Countryside Partnership carries out valuable work that benefits Waverley, through protecting and enhancing this important `green corridor` and helping local residents to enjoy the area as well as becoming practically involved through its community involvement programme. The grant aid provided by Waverley is essential in supporting core costs and as matching funding to bring in additional resources. It is vital the request for funding is fully supported. If the local authority partners withdraw funding it would threaten the viability of the whole project and the valuable work would have to be picked up by others. The Hurtwood Control manages an extensive area (3000 acres) of accessible countryside predominately woodland and heathland, to the north east of the borough that is well used by Waverley residents. The work of Hurtwood control also helps to deliver the county Biodiversity Action Plans for heathland and involves the local community through its volunteer programme.

The Hurtwood Control provides opportunity for a variety of leisure activities in the borough by encouraging the use of the area for walkers, horse riders, cyclists and orienteers.

Hurtwood Control provides good value for Waverley residents: its operation is dependent on grants and donations. FWAG provides conservation advice and information to farmers and landowners in Waverley. This is delivered in the form of free farm visits, unlimited telephone advice a bi-annual newsletter and a website. It also supports the Surrey Hills local food producer group and is involved with the Surrey Farm & Village Week.

The work of FWAG is increasingly important with the changes in farming subsidies and the new environmental stewardship schemes that have been recently launched. Their work and advice to landowners helps to improve biodiversity within Waverley and conserve the landscape and improve public access.
The Surrey Heathland Project deliver the Heathland Biodiversity Action Plan by coordinating and carrying out heathland restoration work within sites in Waverley, including Frensham, Blackheath and Mare Hill Commons. The five-year programme of heathland restoration is supported by 13 partner organisations.

The project is important in coordinating work on the restoration of threatened heathland habitat and providing valuable advice to land managers. Waverley’s contribution is essential to the viability of this project and to cover core costs, in particular now the work funded by the Heritage Lottery has been completed.
The Surrey Hills AONB unit works to protect and conserve the landscape of the Surrey Hills AONB (the AONB covers half the borough), improve public understanding of the area and support the rural economy. It assists local authorities in meeting their statutory duties to AONB’s through preparing the AONB statutory Management Plan.

The grant aid provided by Waverley is essential in supporting the unit’s core costs and as matching funding to bring in additional resources to the AONB (the Countryside Agency provides 75% of core funding). It is vital the request for funding is fully supported as the Executive have now approved its commitment to the AONB by signing up to the new Memorandum of Agreement.

HEALTH – THEME 3

Age Concern Cranleigh & District

Cranleigh Day Centre is a community facility run by Age Concern Cranleigh for older people and is situated next to Rowland House sheltered housing scheme.

Age Concern Cranleigh aims to make a positive impact on the quality of life of older people by delivering a range of services and activities that promote good health and well-being; creating opportunities for older people to live a full and active life and to remain independent; and promoting social inclusion by enabling older people to participate in and contribute to their community.

The Centre offers a range of social, cultural and well-being activities including holidays and trips, arts and craft groups and exercise sessions. Lunches and snacks are available each weekday, and services include day care, bathing, chiropody, hairdressing, eye tests, nail care, hearing aid testing and advice.

Transport for regular visitors is provided by Hoppa, supplemented by volunteer car journeys.

The Cranleigh Day Centre premises are leased from the Borough Council, the organisation is responsible for repairs and maintenance. In addition to the grant Waverley Council currently contributes to the running costs of the Centre through the employment of the cook; however this arrangement will cease from April 2007.

The centre is linked to Rowland House, which is earmarked for redevelopment, this has caused some difficulties in maintaining a positive image in the community and customer numbers have fallen. Correspondingly finances are not as comfortable as they could be.

Age Concern Cranleigh has merged with Age Concern Waverley for governance purposes although this should have little effect on the finances of this organisation.

Day care services, including bathing, for frailer customers are a separate project and are funded from the Waverley Voluntary Grants Partnership (pooled funding).

The grant has remained reasonably static for the last few years, representing a fall in funding. The organisation is asking for an increase on last year’s budget over and above inflation, to keep up with rising costs.

An inflationary increase is recommended, keeping them slightly ahead of some other centres to recognise their additional building maintenance responsibilities.

Farncombe Day Centre is a community facility run by Age Concern Farncombe for older people and is situated next to Bowring House sheltered housing scheme.

The organisation aims to make a positive impact on the quality of life of older people by delivering a range of services and activities that promote good health and well-being; creating opportunities for older people to live a full and active life and to remain independent; and promoting social inclusion by enabling older people to participate in and contribute to their community.

The Centre offers a range of social, cultural and well-being activities including holidays and trips, arts and craft groups and exercise sessions. Lunches and snacks are available each weekday, and services include bathing, chiropody, hairdressing, eye tests, nail care, hearing aid testing and advice. The Centre has good links with partner organisations to offer a “one stop shop” e.g. the Pensions Service, CAB, community nurses).

The Centre provides transport for regular visitors.

Farncombe Day Centre operates from a Council property for which there are minimal service charges. The Borough Council meets most of the costs of repairs and maintenance.

The day care and bathing services are separate projects and are currently funded from the Waverley Voluntary Grants Partnership (pooled funding).

The grant has remained reasonably static for the last few years, representing a fall in funding. The organisation is asking for an increase on last year’s budget slightly over and above inflation, to keep up with rising costs. An inflationary increase is recommended.

Age Concern Haslemere & District

The organisation aims to make a positive impact on the quality of life of older people by delivering a range of services and activities that promote good health and well-being; creating opportunities for older people to live a full and active life and to remain independent; and promoting social inclusion by enabling older people to participate in and contribute to their community.

Age Concern offers a range of social, cultural and well-being activities for older people including computer groups, tai chi, art group, grandparent and toddler group and reflexology. Services include bathing, day care, chiropody and hairdressing.

On 2 days a week there is no care assistant and Age Concern has developed a programme of activities to particularly attract more active older people. The restaurant at Haslewey is open to the whole community and lunches and snacks are available every weekday.

Transport for regular visitors is provided by Hoppa.

Haslemere Age Concern operates its activities from Haslewey Community Centre, for which there is a substantial charge. Haslewey manages the building and its use by the wider community, leaving Age Concern to focus on the service to older people. Haslewey also currently manages the catering. Due to this arrangement Haslemere Age Concern has less ability than others to raise other income (e.g. from hire of premises or from sale of meals).

Day care services, including bathing, for frailer customers are separate projects and are funded from the Waverley Voluntary Grants Partnership (pooled funding).

The grant has remained reasonably static for the last few years, representing a fall in funding. The organisation is asking for an increase on last year’s budget over and above inflation, to keep up with rising costs. An inflationary increase is recommended.

Brightwells Gostrey Centre

Brightwells Gostrey Centre is a community facility for older people with the centre used out of hours for other groups.

The organisation aims to make a positive impact on the quality of life of older people by delivering a range of services and activities that promote good health and well-being; creating opportunities for older people to live a full and active life and to remain independent; and promoting social inclusion by enabling older people to participate in and contribute to their community.

The Centre offers a range of social, cultural and well-being activities including holidays and trips, art group, exercise sessions and massage and relaxation.
Lunches and snacks are available each weekday, and services include day care, bathing, chiropody, hairdressing, and therapy sessions encouraging independent living.

Transport for regular visitors is provided by the organisation itself.

Brightwells Gostrey Centre operates from a Council property for which there are minimal service charges. The Borough Council meets most of the costs of repairs and maintenance.

The organisation has been proactive in seeking alternative sources of funding for certain projects. Day care and therapeutic services, including bathing, for frailer customers are separate projects and are funded from the Waverley Voluntary Grants Partnership (pooled funding), however they have had some grants reduced in the last year and they are having to counteract this with other activities but are constrained by an out dated and ageing building.

They are within the proposed East Street redevelopment area and are anticipating the provision of a new community building in the coming years.

The grant has remained reasonably static for the last few years, representing a fall in funding. The organisation is asking for an increase on last year’s budget slightly over and above inflation, to keep up with rising costs. An inflationary increase is recommended.


Farnham District Sports Advisory Council provides a valuable service in developing and promoting sport in the Farnham locality. They provide information, help and guidance to local sports clubs and individuals on current issues, including funding provisions, rate relief and development of sports facilities. They also provide information on sporting facilities and activities available locally and lobby on behalf of the sporting public to improve existing facilities. The organisation also provides a valuable link between the voluntary sector and the local authority including contributing to the Farnham health check.

In 2007/08 the applicants plan to concentrate their activities on:

· Organising the annual sports personality awards
· A new initiative to encourage sports clubs to promote events for the young and those age 60+
· Providing grants towards equipment and coaching courses.

Milford and Villages Day Centre is a community facility for older people but the centre is working to widen its focus and, especially out of hours, the facility is also used by other groups.

The organisation aims to make a positive impact on the quality of life of older people by delivering a range of services and activities that promote good health and well-being; creating opportunities for older people to live a full and active life and to remain independent; and promoting social inclusion by enabling older people to participate in and contribute to their community.

The Centre offers a range of social, cultural and well-being activities including talks and discussions, arts and crafts, exercise and reflexology. Lunches and snacks are available each weekday, and services include bathing, day care, chiropody and hairdressing. Transport for regular visitors is provided by the organisation itself.

The grant application meets the criteria and has been well presented with a good business plan.

Milford and Villages Day Centre operates from its own building and pays for repairs and maintenance from its own funds and has generally received a slightly greater amount of grant (currently an additional £2,660) than most of the other centres. The Centre is well staffed. The organisation’s fund raising efforts are very successful. They have healthy reserves.

The bathing service and day care service are separate projects and are funded from the Waverley Voluntary Grants Partnership (pooled funding).

The grant has remained reasonably static for the last few years, representing a fall in funding. The organisation is asking for an increase on last year’s budget over and above inflation, to keep up with rising costs and to counteract the effect of additional catering costs, where previously WBC helped to fund the post of cook.

An increase in line with inflation is recommended plus an amount to reinstate the differential between this and other centres to recognise their additional maintenance responsibilities.
Sport Godalming provides a valuable service in developing and promoting sport in the Godalming locality. They provide information, help and guidance to local sports clubs and individuals on current issues, including funding provisions, rate relief and development of sports facilities. They also provide information on sporting facilities and activities available locally and lobby on behalf of the sporting public to improve existing facilities. The organisation also provides a valuable link between the voluntary sector and the local authority. As well as organising the annual Sports Awards, contributing to the Godalming Leisure Needs Special Interest Group and producing regular newsletters.

As an organisation it needs funding to enable it to develop and operate, to increase its profile and undertake the required administration work of the organisation. Without the Sports Council it would be very difficult for Waverley Borough Council to support clubs to the required level. The setting up and support of local sports councils is a recommendation of the Waverley Cultural Strategy and provides excellent value for money.

The applicants plan to use any funding towards:

· an 2012 Olympic scheme for local participants
· promoting an inter-town “superstars” event
· promotion and publicity of their Club Development Forum. Sport Haslemere provides a valuable service in developing and promoting sport in the Haslemere locality. They provide information, help and guidance to local sports clubs and individuals on current issues, including funding provisions, rate relief and development of sports facilities. They also provide information on sporting facilities and activities available locally and lobby on behalf of the sporting public to improve existing facilities. The organisation also provides a valuable link between the voluntary sector and the local authority, as well as organising the annual Sports Awards, contributing to the development of sporting facilities at Woolmer Hill and producing regular newsletters.
· host the annual sports awards ceremony
· provide a twice-yearly newsletter to member clubs
· make grants to member clubs. LOCAL ECONOMY & LOCAL SERVICES – THEME 6

Farnham Maltings is a creative organisation that operates out of a multi-disciplinary arts and cultural centre.

Farnham Maltings is a major cultural asst in Waverley and provides a focus for regional agencies to invest in the cultural vitality of the Borough. It continues to work on behalf of the Arts Council to manage a 3-year Rural Touring Initiative, that benefits Waverley residents in rural areas.

The creative business advice service offering affordable workspace and bespoke business advice is significant in supporting and underpinning the local creative economy while initiatives such as after-school arts clubs, a Borough-wide initiative for the development of youth theatre and workshop opportunities for adults living in socially deprived areas are a compelling force in community development.

Audiences have increased sustainability and the organisation has been instrumental in delivery a number of partnership projects in Waverley communities in conjunction with the Council’s arts service. It has also delivered interim leadership to the Cranleigh Arts Centre as they develop their long-term strategy. Godalming Museum aims to promote the enjoyment and relevance of the heritage of the town and its surrounding villages and to encourage and support lifelong learning. It does this by collecting, safeguarding and making accessible local artefacts and knowledge within a welcoming, stimulating and inclusive environment.

The Museum continues to provide excellent services and has endeavoured to expand its work within local communities in Godalming, such as Aarons Hill/Ockford Ridge with projects such as Keeping Memories Alive.

Much work has been done to maintain and develop the children’s holiday activities and the Museum is working with local schools to develop its loan boxes. With the ongoing support from Godalming Town Council the Trust has employed a part time visitor services administrator who is developing and supporting training opportunities for the many volunteers upon which the Museum depends and contributing to the overall improvement in customer service.

In addition, the Museum is making substantial improvements in relation to remote access to the collections via the web.

Continued financial support is considered essential.

Haslemere Educational Museum

The aim of the organisation is to forward and advance the study of science, literature and fine arts by means of a well-equipped museum of natural history and objects of art and of a scientific, literary and historical nature.

The Museum continues to work proactively delivering a wide range of activities for the local community as well as preserving and exhibiting the collections for the wider community. This year the funding provided through the Heritage Lottery Fund for the education officer will expire and will therefore have an impact on the museums available resources.

Although the organisation has funding available, in the long term the current assets are not sufficient and the organisation is heavily reliant on the Waverley grant. It is also apparent that an element of the Museum’s regular funding is not available in 2007-08 and officers are seeking to arrange a meeting with the Museum to discuss their finances.
The hall exists for the use of the residents of Haslemere and the surrounding area. It provides a venue for a range of community and cultural activities including cinema, concerts, and theatre.

The Haslemere Hall continues to provide a valuable service as a venue in Haslemere and offers opportunity for local residents to attend cultural events and activities.

The venue is a valuable asset to the town and is mainly run by volunteers with a small paid staff who undertake an enormous amount of work. The Trust is reliant on the SOS grant to help with the running costs of the venue, which are significantly higher than the income generated from its current activities. Last year, concern was raised about the lack of documentation concerning health & safety, risk assessments and child protection issues and evidently this has not been addressed. The organisation requires support and encouragement to develop new partnerships with others in the community: for example youth groups and youth art providers would find use of the facility highly beneficial for their work.
The Rural Life Centre provides a repository for items representative of rural life between the years 1750 and 1960, drawn largely from Surrey, Sussex and Hampshire border area. It covers a ten-acre site situated in woodland and meadows.

The items are displayed and interpreted for schools, interest groups, general visitors and researchers to help them understand the rich past and traditions of the local area and the English countryside in general.

Items are also loaned out for education and research, and museum staff make off-site presentations to interested groups. This year the Museum has been successful in gaining accreditation to the MLA scheme that has involved redrafting and updating all museum policies in line with best practice and demonstrates the Museum’s continuing improvement in relation to the quality of services offered.

The Museum has again continued to develop its services and exhibitions, which have already proved to be extremely popular, making it an asset to the heritage of the Borough. Whilst the Museum is benefiting from increased visitor numbers, with a growing collection and on-going improvements to the quality and size of the exhibits the Museum still requires Waverley’s ongoing support.

In particular, the need for on-going building maintenance and basic infrastructure repairs that are not eligible from other sources of funding. The particular areas to be considered in 2007/08 will be the resurfacing of further sections of the museum’s roadways, improvements to the car park and on-going maintenance of the display buildings.




PROMOTING SOCIAL INCLUSION, CHALLENGING SOCIAL EXCLUSION – THEME 8
40 Degreez is aimed at meeting the need for the provision of youth services in Farnham. The 40 Degreez building has become a dedicated youth centre whose purpose is to be a ‘one stop’ centre aimed at reaching out to all young people in Farnham and the surrounding areas. The facility provides a youth café/drop in area open 3 hours per day 3 days a week and 6 hours on a Saturday, to be augmented during the school holidays. The venue will also be hired to groups and organisations delivering activities for young people. The venue will provide a base for a range of agencies delivering targeted work with young people at risk of social or educational exclusion. The principal being a young person centred approach under one roof where young people can benefit from a range of services, advice and support.

This project meets a number of key Council objectives in relation to young people and social inclusion in particular. This is the first facility of its type in Waverley and a wide range of partners supports it. Facilities of this type in other authorities have proved to be extremely successful and beneficial to young people. The need for revenue support in the early stages of development is necessary in order to promote the facility to agencies that work with young people. It is anticipated however that as the facility becomes more popular the need for revenue support will diminish. The need for this type of facility has been identified in the Council’s recent Youth Service Best Value Review.

Age Concern Waverley promotes the well-being of people over 55 in the Waverley area by providing access to information and advice and services to support people in their own homes.

Despite moving from the shop front in Godalming enquiries have risen in the last year.

The organisation receives alternative funding for its distinct handyman and gardening projects.

The handyman service ensures that older people have access to minor household repairs from an organisation that they can trust. As part of the service fire risk assessments are undertaken and smoke detectors are installed where necessary, also home risk assessments are carried out to assist in preventing accidents and falls.

The gardening service helps older people to keep their garden under control and is vital for security, safety and independence. The service matches a vetted and monitored gardener to an older person at a controlled hourly rate. These services are essential to enable people to remain independent for as long as possible.

The organisation has merged with Age Concern Cranleigh for governance purposes and has moved to alternative premises in Cranleigh at a significantly reduced rent. There is a healthy surplus from 2005/06 and good reserves which look likely to improve.

It is recommended that the organisation receive the same grant as in 2006-7.

Citizens Advice Waverley

In 2005, the Council undertook a major review of the Citizens Advice service across the Borough, in partnership with the National Association of CABx (NACAB) and the three CABx Management Committees in Farnham, Godalming and Haslemere & Cranleigh. This review resulted in a recommendation to create one Waverley-wide CAB, a new governing body, revise the staffing structure and introduce new ways of working, whilst maintaining the CAB outlets in each of the four main centres of population.

These recommendations have been implemented and a new Citizens Advice Waverley came into being on 1 April 2006.

The CAB operation provides advice and advocacy services to all people who call on them. From April-October 2006, the CAB has helped 5,563 individuals, dealing with 6,911 enquiries in their offices and 3,325 over the telephone.

The CAB is developing its services to provide more accessible advice face-to-face, by telephone, email and information on-line.

The work of the CAB compliments and supports that of the Council, providing advice on housing, benefits advice, debt counselling, and a range of other matters. They have secured nearly £442,000 of financial gains for its clients through increased benefits, debts written off and other one-off payments.

Citizens Advice Waverley has responded positively to the challenges made by the Council and NACAB. It is now considered to be a model of how CAB should operate.

Haslemere Activities Unit for the Disabled (HAU4D)

HAU4D aims to promote independence and mental stimulation, to provide recreational activities, social interaction and personal support for people with disabilities in the areas local to Haslemere and to raise the necessary funding to support the Charity.

This project better meets the criteria for the Waverley Voluntary Grants Partnership as a service with a focus on health and social care.

Waverley BC pooled its funding for organisations like this with the PCT and SCC and handed over several similar organisations (e.g. lunch clubs, Four Villages day centre).

Unfortunately the deadline for that funding scheme has passed and funding would not be available for 2007/08.
A Place to Be Youth Group was initially a project set up by the Haslemere Initiative with the aim to provide a safe meeting place for young people in the town, especially targeting those who have difficulty in accessing other youth provision. The youth group has now established its own Management Committee and is currently revisiting the constitution to deliver their aims and objectives. The club would like to start targeting 8-10 year olds, and also address some of the anti-social behaviour issues that have become a problem on the adjacent Lion Green area.

The project will assist Waverley in delivering its corporate priorities in relation to young people, and the original pilot project has been well received locally. However, whilst funding is being sought from a range of other sources, it is not clear how the County Council’s Youth services are contributing, as they are not identified as a key partner.

Sculpt it is a charitable visual arts organisation, that responds to public art commissions and delivers participatory outreach work in a variety of community and therapeutic settings. The creative work of the organisation is inclusive and driven by the principle of access for all, giving those most in need an opportunity to express themselves creatively for their own personal development and for community benefit. A significant amount of Sculpt it’s work is delivered across Waverley and is focussed on children and young people, adults with special needs and those living in rural and socially deprived areas. In addition to running an extensive outreach programme, Sculpt it operates from two community studio spaces in Farncombe and Witley.

The grant would be used to support the costs of a new partner whose primary role would be to address organisational and operational issues, update policies and procedures, raise the profile of the organisation through the redesigning of publicity materials and advise the Director in the future development of the business.

The organisation provides a valuable service to Waverley, that would be missed by the community if it no longer existed. It is recognised that there are some internal weaknesses but positive action is planned to overcome these.


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