Waverley Borough Council Home Page Waverley Borough Council Home Page


Waverley Borough Council Committee System - Committee Document

Meeting of the Executive held on 10/07/2007
Play Strategy 2007 -2010




1


PLAY STRATEGY

2007 - 2010

Play Strategy

Foreword

The aim of this strategy is to ensure a strategic and planned approach to the development and enhancement of the quality of children’s play opportunities in Waverley.

This Strategy has evolved through working in partnership with a variety of statutory and voluntary agencies and consultation with stakeholders and a number of user groups. Through this process a detailed document with accompanying action plan has been produced which will now be the strategic approach for play developed across the borough. The policy will now be incorporated into the other key strategies of Waverley that includes, the Waverley Corporate Plan, Community Plan and Cultural Strategy.

The Strategy will also form the basis of Waverley Borough Council’s bid to the Big Lottery Fund Children’s Play Programme in which Waverley has been allocated £200,000. Receipt of this is dependent upon the Borough having in place a strategic Play Strategy.

To receive a share of the allotted money, the Borough Council, as the applying authority, is required to develop a portfolio of projects that focus on areas of greatest need and that form part of a local play strategy. These projects will follow on from the significant investment we have already allocated in relation to providing new and replacement children’s playgrounds.

Waverley has consulted with various stakeholders, partners and user groups and identified a number of projects and initiatives that aim to meet the identified need of children, young people and families within the Borough, and these are presented within this comprehensive Play Strategy which aims to maximise the opportunities for play development over the next few years.


Stefan Reynolds
Portfolio Holder, for Children and Young People

Index

Contents
Page Number
Introduction
Defining Play
Why Children’s Play Matters
Barriers to Play
Why we need a Play Strategy
Who will Benefit
The Vision
3
Context
Local
Regional
National
6
Position Statement
Profile of Waverley
Map to show the geographical layout of the parishes
Population
Ethinic Groups
Religion
10
Development Of Play Strategy
Play Steering Group
Existing Unsupervised Play Opportunities
Existing Supervised Play Opportunities
Children with Disabilities
Training and Support
Voluntary Groups
12
Consultation
Focus Groups
Questionnaires
Other User Groups
Youth Council
15
Action Plan
19


1. Introduction

1.1 Defining Play

There is a wide range of play definitions. Getting Serious About Play (2004) uses the straightforward description of play as:
‘What children and young people do when they follow their own ideas and interests in their own way and for their own reasons’.

Where as The Best Play Review suggests that:
Play is freely chosen, personally directed, intrinsically motivated behaviour that actively engages the child. Play can be fun or serious. Through play children explore social, material and imaginary worlds and their relationship with them, elaborating all the while a flexible range of responses to the challenges they encounter.’

Neither definition is more appropriate than the other they are just clearly stating that play is about choice and freedom for the child.

1.2 Why Children’s Play Matters

The United Nations Convention on the Rights of the child sets out the 41 articles for children and the corresponding obligations of governments to safeguard these rights. Education, leisure and cultural activities, including the right to education and the rights to play, leisure and participation in cultural life and the arts are included in the declaration. In many parts of the world this is difficult to achieve, however here in Britain we are much more fortunate. We can provide safe play facilities and improve access to them. We can encourage children to explore and use their imagination, this in turn, helps to develop social skills which will benefit them all through their lifes.

The impulse to play comes from within the child, and is intentional only in the sense of being about what interest children themselves. This is the freedom which play allows for children when the interests of others, especially adults, recede into the background.

Play itself can be considered from a number of perspectives. Socially it teaches children how to behave with their peers, how to share and work in teams and make their opinions known. Although freedom is a fundamental of Play, often those engaging in it agree rules and tasks and challenges and a code of conduct is born. This can be seen as early development of cultural behaviour.

Play is valued as an important part in the development of a young person by developing problem solving, goal directed behaviour and greater persistence with early schooling to name just a few. Play is also an essential component of education, or from the health perspective as a mechanism to promote physical and mental health

Perhaps it has been a disadvantage for Play that it is so universally relevant to almost every aspect of life: yet it has rarely had a high profile champion, and has never been treated or resourced as its importance might suggest.

The Play state of mind, body, emotion and spirit is one that holds benefits throughout life. Opportunities to engage in Play as much as possible in the early years will only help to sustain the benefits of Play in people, as they get older.

1.3 Barriers to Play

Children and young people have commonly identified many barriers (and perceived barriers) to play, recreation and their enjoyment of public space. These include: fears for their safety, especially from bullying; traffic; dirty, boring, or run-down play areas.

The perception of danger outside the home, which is reinforced by legal, social and insurance attitudes to risk, are restricting the natural adventurousness of children which leads to making play a tame and frustrating activity.

Play is a key element in children learning to appreciate, assess and take calculated risks, which is fundamental to their development. Children and young people will always seek out opportunities that will challenge their risk taking skills and it is the responsibility of the play provider to respond with exciting and stimulating activities and environments that balance the risks appropriately.

The Play Safety Forum, a group of national agencies involved in play safety, has produced Managing Risk in Play Provision to support the work of those involved in play provision.

1.4 Why we need a Play Strategy

Play provision should be universal and it’s planning should recognise that play deprivation is a serious disadvantage for children and that fully inclusive and accessible play provision can have an important role in enhancing their lives.

Recently there has been a drive to encourage local authorities to develop a strategic approach to children’s play with the aim to enhance local play provision. The Mayor of London’s draft guide to preparing play strategies suggests, “a play strategy, developed by a range of local authority and community stakeholders, will promote a better understanding of the importance of play and ensure children’s needs are taken into account within the wider community”.

The document Every Child Matters (2003): Change for Children states that ‘enjoyment’ with ‘achievement’ is a key outcome for children and young people, and play is seen as a major part of the duty to provide ‘recreation’. It is therefore recommended that a play strategy is the best way to ensure that the objective of enjoyment (play and recreation) is realised for all children and young people.

Planning for play – a briefing for local authorities, states that local authorities need to provide for children and young people’s play because:

Good play benefits children, families and communities,
Children and adults consistently say they want more provision for children and young people
Opportunities for children and young people to play freely are constantly being eroded
Providing for children’s play addresses many important policy objectives.

1.5 Who will Benefit

The strategy will provide a working document that will ensure a strategic and planned approach to develop new and enhance existing play opportunities in the communities of Waverley. This will include supporting current play providers, as well as coordinating the development of new providers and opportunities.

This working strategy recognises the importance of play in the social, physical, intellectual, creative and emotional development of children and will link in with similar objectives of other strategies, to ensure that the communities have the potential to receive these benefits.

1.6 The Vision

The development of the play strategy builds on the themes identified in the Waverley Corporate Plan. The plan sets out how Waverley can be improved and achieve the borough’s vision, which is:

‘To enhance the quality of life in Waverley, now and for the future, through strong local leadership, customer-focussed service, and the empowerment of local communities’

In order to implement the vision, time and resources are focussed on working to meet the key aims and objectives, which are:

1.6.1 The key aims of the Waverley Borough Play Strategy

1. To ensure that the development of new play opportunities include the three ‘Fs’, free to the children, they are free to come and go and free to choose and manage their own activity wherever possible.

2. To extend the choice and control that children and young people have over their play, the freedom they enjoy and the satisfaction they gain from it

3. To recognise the participant’s need to test boundaries and respond positively to that need

4. To manage the balance between the need to offer risk and the need to keep children and young adults free from harm

5. To maximise the range of play opportunities available across Waverley

6. To ensure that play is inclusive, regardless of disability, special needs, ethnicity and economic circumstance

7. To foster independence, self-esteem and respect for others by offering opportunities for social interaction

8. To foster well-being, healthy growth and development, knowledge and understanding, creativity and the capacity to learn in both children and young people

9. Build respect and understanding between the generations and seek to manage potential conflicts caused by differing perceptions of play

1.6.2 Main Objectives

1. Development opportunities for the future expansion of the play provision opportunities.

2. Improvement of unsupervised play opportunities.

3. Improve access to supervised play opportunities to all children including those with disabilities and on low incomes.

4. Increasing provision. Target resources to the areas of greatest need for play improvements.

5. Establish the people and organisational structures that are required to ensure effective implementation of the play strategy.

6. Ensure the development or improvement of play environments supports, Every Child Matters - Five Outcomes, Best Play Objectives and Enriched Play Environment Criteria.

7. Commitment to ensure the play strategy is adopted into relevant local plans.

2. Context

The aims and actions of this strategy support many of the objectives and targets set in other key strategies at a local, regional and national level. These include:

2.1 Local
2.1.1 Waverley Corporate Plan 2006/07

Waverley Borough Council publishes its Corporate Plan annually in order to assess the Councils performance during the previous year, and look at plans for the future.

The Play Strategy will link in closely with the aim of, ‘promoting a high quality of life in strong, healthy and socially inclusive communities.’
The key objectives for this aim are:

1. promote, provide and improve cultural and leisure facilities for all

2. support and deliver projects and services to improve opportunities for children and younger people, in an environment where they are assured a high standard of safety and security

3. foster improved equality of opportunity for people living with disability and impairment

2.1.2 Waverley Community Strategy 2003

This strategy was developed following extensive community consultation. The issues raised crystallised into eight themes, which were adopted by the Local Strategic Partnership. The strategy seeks to tackle issues that affect the life of Waverley residents.
The development of the Play Strategy will support the delivery of Theme 3, ‘Health’, with the aim of ‘promoting healthy lifestyles’ amongst young people.

2.1.3 Waverley Cultural Strategy 2003 - 2008

The Cultural Strategy for Waverley sets out the vision for the development of cultural services, facilities and activities within the borough, by both the Council and external service providers. This strategy directs the work of Waverley’s Leisure Services and demonstrates how leisure and culture contributes to delivering the wider corporate objectives of the Borough Council. Within the Cultural Strategy Action Plan adopted by the Council a key action was to ‘work with local partners to develop and promote a corporate play policy and strategy.

2.2 Regional

2.2.1 Children and Young People’s Plan for Surrey 2006 – 2009

Defined by the requirements of the Children Act 2004, the Children’s National Service Framework and based on the five outcomes of Every Child Matters, the plan has been built around a comprehensive analysis of the needs of children and young people.

There are eight key priorities for children and young people. The Play Strategy will support the delivery of ‘reducing obesity’, ‘making a positive contribution’ and ‘enjoying and achieving’ priorities.

2.2.2. The Early Years and Childcare Implementation Plan

This plan sets out the key priorities and strategic goals of Surrey County Council’s Early Years and Childcare service. Reflecting on issues such as Children’s Centres, Early Education, Special Needs and Training and Recruitment the plan looks at developing services for children across Surrey.

2.2.3 Tackling Obesity in West Surrey: A Strategy for Prevention and Management 2004 and Choosing Health in the South East: Making Healthy Choices Easier

As obesity has become one of the major public health challenges, these 2 strategies aim to describe the prevalence, causes and impact of obesity in the region. The strategic aims are the effective prevention and intervention for those people who are overweight or obese. They identify the issues relating to children’s obesity levels and recognise that physical activity policies are instrumental in tackling obesity. The government has identified obesity as a priority area and has set the target of halting the rise in childhood obesity by 2010.

2.3 National

2.3.1 Choice for Parents: a Ten Year Strategy for Childcare

The ten year strategy for childcare sets out the government’s vision to ensure that every child gets the best start in life and that parents are given more choice about how to balance work and family life. The strategy looks at the development of provision of extended out of school childcare places for all children aged 3 – 14 between the hours of 8am and 6pm each weekday by 2010.

2.3.2 Every Child Matters

The government document Every Child Matters: Change for Children (December 2004) sets out the national framework for local change programmes to build services around the needs of children and young people so that opportunity is maximised and risk is minimised. It indicates the national and local priorities for children’s services and sets out an outcomes framework, which includes five outcomes for children and young people, which are:

Being Healthy – Enjoy good physical and mental health and living a healthy lifestyle

Staying Safe – Being protected from harm and neglect

Enjoying and Achieving – Getting the most out of life and developing the skills for adulthood

Making a Positive Contribution – Being involved with the community and society and not engaging in anti-social or offending behaviour

Economic well-being – Not being prevented by economic disadvantage from achieving their full potential in life.

These five outcomes were developed from consultation with children and young people and are at the heart of the Children Act 2004, which means everyone must make these aims their top priorities for the services they provide to all children and young people. The outcomes are universal ambitions for every child and young person whatever their background or circumstances.

2.3.3 Best Play 2000 – What play provision should do for children

This report looks at how children benefit from play opportunities; how play services and spaces can provide these benefits; and how they can show that they are providing them. Produced in partnership with the National Playing Fields Association, PLAYLINK and the Children’s Play Council, Best Play is of interest to practitioners as well as local authorities, government departments, funding bodies and all those working in children's play.

The publication sets out seven objectives

1. Extend the choice and control that children have over their play, the freedom they enjoy and the satisfaction they gain from it

2. Recognise the child’s need to test boundaries and responds positively to that need.

3. Manage the balance between the need to offer risk and the need to keep children safe from harm.

4. Maximise the range of lay opportunities.

5. Foster independence and self-esteem.

6. Foster children’s respect for others and offers opportunities for social interaction.

7. Foster the child’s well-being, healthy growth and development, knowledge and understanding, creativity and capacity to learn.

The publication also details an Enriched Play Environment Criteria that offers further guidance on the opportunities play provision should provide

1. A varied and interesting environment.

2. Challenge in relation to the physical environment.

3. Playing with the natural elements - earth, water, fire, air.

4. Movement - e.g. running, jumping, rolling, climbing, balancing.

5. Manipulating natural and fabricated materials

6. Stimulation of the five senses.

7. Experiencing change in the natural and built environment. Social interactions.

8. Playing with identity.

9. Experiencing a range of emotions.

2.3.4 Children Act 2004

The Children Act 2004 provides the legislative foundation to support the Every Child Matters: Change for Children programme. It outlines the new statutory duties and clarifies accountabilities for children’s services.

The act establishes a legal responsibility on local authorities to make arrangements to promote the co-operation between agencies and other appropriate bodies in order to improve a child’s well being. There is also a further duty on key partners to take part in the co-operation of these arrangements.

3. Position Statement

3.1 Profile of Waverley

Waverley Borough Council is situated in South-West Surrey. It is a rural district and the largest by geographic area in Surrey. Shaped by the Downs to the north and the Greensand Hills and Weald Clay to the south and it is an area of contrast and variety and of outstanding natural beauty.

Waverley has a population of 115,665 covering 133 square miles. 76% of land use is agriculture and woodland and 61% of the Borough is designated green belt. The area has three tiers of local government throughout with four main settlements - Farnham, Godalming, Haslemere and Cranleigh. The rest of the area has 17 rural parish councils comprising 20 villages.

3.2 Map to show the geographical layout of the parishes that form the borough of Waverley


3.3 Population

Waverley has a population of around 115,500 containing a mix of ages and some mix in culture and faith.

The percentage of population in the 0-34 age group in Waverley is lower than the national average, but above average in the 35-89 age group. Generally there are less people in the 0-24 age group with only 18% aged 0-14 and 11.1% aged 15-24.

In the 2001 census it was identified that there were a total of 33,637 - 0-24 year olds living in Waverley. It is suggested that the population of Waverley is changing and projections indicate that by 2016 the number of children aged 0-19 in the Borough will fall by 0.9% and the number of older residents will increase.

The Surrey Early Years and Childcare Service Audit 2006 identifies that there is a total of 18,427 children aged 0-14 years living in Waverley. With 7,480 being aged 0-5 and 8,083 aged 6-11.

3.4 Ethnic Groups

The population of Waverley is predominantly white, with only 2.6% of residents coming from other non-white ethnic backgrounds.

The three wards of Waverley that have the highest concentration of non-white ethnic minorities are Godalming, Charterhouse ward, Frensham, Dockenfield and Tilford ward and Farnham Castle with a total of 14.2%.

3.5 Religion

Three quarters of people living in Waverley are Christian. Although the Borough is not as diverse as some areas, the other major religions are also represented, while 15.5% of residents are classified as having no religious beliefs.


4. Development of the Strategy

4.1 Play Strategy Steering Group

In developing the strategy it was recognised that play provision in Waverley involves many different organisations, departments and individuals. To ensure that the strategy reflects the diverse range of provision and organisations involved in play, a Play Strategy Steering Group was established. This group includes representatives from; the town and parish councils, voluntary play organisations, Disability Challenges (a charitable organisation that provides play and leisure activities for children and young people with disabilities), representatives from Waverley Borough Council planning, housing and countryside, Surrey County Council’s Early Years and local play organisations. See Appendix 3 – Acknowledgements for a list of the organisations that make up the Play Strategy Steering Group.

The group has been consulted at all stages of the development of the play strategy. The steering group will be responsible for monitoring the implementation of the action plan and will play a pivotal role in sourcing further funding for the continuation of the strategy after the initial 3-year lifespan.

4.2 Existing Unsupervised Play Opportunities

4.2.1 Play Areas

The vast majority (85%) of the 61 NPFA classified play areas are provided by Waverley Borough Council, with the Parish/Town Councils providing just 9 play areas. Waverley Borough Council also provides the 15 additional play areas that are not NPFA classified.

Waverley employs an independent play facilities inspector to assist with the development of maintenance and upgrade plans. The inspector also conducted a play value study in 2006. This method involves the inspector awarding a value for each piece of equipment on site, which reflects it’s particular potential to provide a user with a certain play experience. Three play value scores are then awarded to each site to demonstrate the potential value of the play experience for toddlers, juniors and teenagers. This process helps identify deficiencies.

The table in appendix 1 is a summary of the play value study. This shows the play value scores for each age group for each play area covered in the study. Teenagers have the lowest play value score (318), while the juniors have the highest play value score (510).

4.2.2 Skate Parks

Currently there are 5 designated skating areas in Waverley. Godalming, Farnham, Haslemere and Cranleigh each have a similar large skate park area with a variety of skate ramps. A second facility has recently been installed in the centre of Godalming, due to the demand for a more centrally located facility.
Following the development of regular user groups meetings with borough council officers the skate parks now have community support and user ownership at each site. The sense of ownership from the users of these facilities seems to reduce the amount of vandalism they previously received.

4.2.3 Youth Shelters

Following extensive public consultation and advice from the Thames Valley Police Best Practise guide, a youth shelter was installed in Haslemere. Recently the Sandy Hill Youth Shelter has been refurbished and is regularly used by the Surrey County Council outreach worker for young people.

4.3 Existing Supervised Play Opportunities

The term “Supervised Play” is used to refer to settings (locations), where informal, structured or free play may happen under the supervision of members of staff or play workers. These settings include breakfast clubs, after school clubs, holiday schemes, activity clubs and parent and toddler groups.

It is recognised that day nurseries, pre-schools and other supervised activities may provide an element of play, however it is felt that these settings are used as a basis for more formal childcare or an educational facility.

4.3.1 After School, Breakfast Clubs Holiday and Play Scheme Provision

There are currently fourteen settings providing after school and breakfast activities across Waverley, providing a total of 380 places per day. These clubs are spread widely across the borough and are located in the following wards. See appendix 2.

These schemes focus on the 4 to 12 age group, providing a wide range of supervised play activities for children throughout the term times and school holidays. Although the spread of settings is over several parts of the borough, it is noticeable that provision in the Godalming area is limited to one setting.

Some of the key schemes are operated through the borough’s leisure centres. Cranleigh and Herons Leisure Centres offer a full holiday scheme operated in-house which is mainly used by parents who work.

The Council operates a ‘B-Active’ scheme in some of the more deprived areas of the borough for 8-12 year olds. This is initially a 3 year scheme (started in October 2005) to offer sport and leisure activities in The Chantries and Sandy Hill (Farnham), Ockford Ridge and Northbourne (Godalming).

4.4 Children with Disabilities

Over recent years, many clubs, especially local sports clubs, have developed their inclusive provision of activities for children and young people. Although many holiday play schemes do provide provision for children with disabilities, many cannot offer the one to one support that may be required due to cost implications.

Waverley Borough Council continues to work with organisations such as; Disability Challengers to further develop inclusive leisure and play opportunities for children and young people with disabilities.

4.5 Training and Support

There is a range of childcare and play work qualifications offered at Guildford College that aim to increase the understanding and skills involved with play work.

The Surrey Early Years and Childcare team also provide a range of courses aimed at continuous improvement and training for individuals working in childcare settings.

4.6 Voluntary Groups

Volunteers play an important role nationally in the provision of opportunities in sport and leisure pursuits. Voluntary, faith and uniformed groups are recognised providers of many out of school leisure opportunities for children and young people across the borough and greatly assist in developing the range of services provided.


5. Consultation

The consultation process consisted of a mix of questionnaires, focus groups and liaison with the play strategy steering group. The purposes of this was to gain a clearer understanding about the current play provision in Waverley, identify needs and wants of the local families and children and to understand more about local children’s play in general.

5.1 Focus Groups

Focus groups were held at 8 junior & primary schools in the borough of Waverley. Each of these groups consisted of about 15 children representing all ages of the schools. In order to achieve representation from each of the 4 major population areas, focus groups were conducted at 2 schools in Haslemere, 3 in Godalming, 2 in Farnham and 1 in Cranleigh.

The discussions with the children were based on finding out more about what is important to the development of children’s play overall. Although this did not give precise information about specific play facilities, it did provide a clearer picture of what children like to do when they play.

5.1.1 Playgrounds

The majority of children living in Waverley said playgrounds were an important aspect of their playtime. Although most can walk to play areas, others require a car journey to reach the nearest facility. Some children said that they preferred to travel outside the borough to visit play areas with a more diverse range of play facilities on offer, especially for the older children. The main issue surrounding playgrounds is the lack of facilities for the older age group who still enjoyed using playgrounds and enjoyed playing on challenging equipment.

The children also highlighted that they particularly enjoyed going to playgrounds which were situated within other communal areas such as, a large open space, near a wooded area or river as this enabled them to play football, cricket, ride their bikes, climb trees or just have the freedom to invent their own play.

Children in Waverley have an outstanding appreciation of nature and this could be due to Waverley being a rural area. Playing in the woods and other areas of nature (rivers, fields, etc.) also featured highly in the list of places that the children go to play. This may also be one of the major factors as to why the majority of children preferred ‘natural’ play areas, rather than the ‘traditional’ playgrounds. The natural areas consisted of more of a mix of typical equipment and other features such as grassy hills, tunnels and old trees instead of climbing frames. The main reason given for this preference was that some of the natural features would allow the children to make up their own games and therefore have more freedom in their play.

5.1.2 After school & holiday activities

The children spoke of the activities that they participated in after school, which consisted of all types of sports, art, drama and dance clubs and uniformed groups such as beavers, rainbows, cubs and guides. The children in Waverley are actively encouraged by their parents to take part in these types of activities and are also seen as a way of entertaining them as well as developing new skills.

A large proportion of children in Waverley had attended some form of holiday camp or playscheme, which they enjoy but their main reason for attendance is due to parents needing childcare whilst they work.

5.2 Questionnaires

Questionnaires were received from the local parish and town councils. The responses helped to get a clearer idea of the levels of usage of play areas and how the councils view local play issues in general. A similar questionnaire was also received from a number of schools and PTA committees.

5.2.1 Playgrounds

In general, the fixed play equipment was well used and situated in good locations and they seemed generally satisfied with the play opportunities in Waverley.
However, an issue of concern was that many play areas are not being used by the appropriate aged children. Older children (and in some cases, teenagers) are using the play equipment. This has brought issues of damage, littering and graffiti. Many of these respondents stated that most the play areas are for the younger children and that there needs to be more areas to accommodate the needs of older children and teenagers.

5.2.2 After school & holiday activities

The responses show that there is a balance of after school and holiday activities available in the different areas of Waverley. However, some mention that they have limited places and fill quickly, or that they are expensive. It is hard to know the motivation from parent groups regarding holiday activities, as it could be interpreted that many want these schemes in order to use them as childcare. One response quoted “there is not sufficient affordable childcare.”

5.3 Other User Groups

The skate park user groups also completed questionnaires. These groups were formed about four years ago and they provide a very useful voice when consulting about the developments of the skate park or other youth facilities in the local areas.
Nearly all of the responses showed that the skate parks are well used, as they visit the facility 2-3 times a week. They also highlighted the problem that the older teenagers (who do not even skate) occupy the facility and prevent some of the skaters from using it for it’s intended purpose.
All skaters wanted more ramps, rails and skating space at the skate parks.
The responses also showed that they wanted more variety of things to do with their play time, as many of them mentioned the need for more youth clubs in the local areas.
Half of the children said that they were not allowed to (or did not think it was safe to) play outside close to their homes, without a parent or someone older being present. Some mentioned that there are busy roads nearby, but others simply said that their parents would not allow them out alone.

5.4 Youth Council
Waverley has an active youth council called the Top Youth Council, which is coordinated by officers from Waverley Environment and Leisure Department, Surrey County Council youth workers and the voluntary sector. One of the main responsibilities of the Council is to be a voice for all young people living or attending school in Waverley. The councillors are the formal mechanism in which to consult on all issues relating to young people and because of the diverse membership they have a broad representation across the borough. The youth council is also responsible for Waverley’s allocation of the Youth Opportunity Fund and the Youth Capital Fund and they meet bi-monthly to consider applications made to their Grant Giving Panel, for projects relating to youth provision in the borough.
The two major projects that have successfully applied for funding are the Cranleigh Youth Café and a youth club in Eashing. These projects are aimed at meeting the need of the young people and teenagers in areas where there are very little facilities available for that particular age group.


6. Action Plan

Following the consultation and research an action plan has been developed which, aims to meet the identified needs of children, young people, families and the local community. Specific projects will aim to address the key priorities, while the action plan will help to guide future play developments in the direction of meeting further identified community needs.
1.0 Objective - Development Opportunities
Action PointExpected BenefitsLinks to Corporate GoalsLead PartnersTarget DateRisk/Other Issues
1.1 Establishment of a ‘Play Development Officer’ post for Waverley.
** See footnoteIncreased research, development and promotion of additional play opportunities.

Increased play provision.

Development of partnerships.Promote, provide & improve cultural & leisure facilities for all

Waverley Borough Council to host the post.

The funding for the post to be secured from the Big Lottery Fund for 3 years.Commencing from 2008Available funding sources
1.2 Investigate the feasibility of developing a large adventure play area, with a mix of natural equipment & surrounding open space.Increased opportunities for children over 9 yrs to continue to use play equipment.Promote, provide and improve cultural and leisure facilities for allParish and Town Councils.

Waverley Borough Council.

Resident Groups and Housing Developers.

School Councils

Top Youth CouncilCommencing from 2008Local residents objections

Available funding sources.

Lack of available space to increase facilities.
**This action is subject to funding being secured through the Big Lottery Fund to enable a Play Development Officer to be appointed. A further report will be brought back to Members when the funding is available to consider the financial implications.
2.0 Objective - The improvement of unsupervised play opportunities
Action PointExpected BenefitsLinks to Corporate GoalsLead PartnersTarget DateRisk/Other Issues
2.1 Develop challenging play areas for children over 9 yrs.
Increased opportunities for children over 9 yrs to continue to use play equipment.Promote, provide and improve cultural and leisure facilities for all Parish and Town Councils.

Waverley Borough Council.

Resident Groups and Housing Developers.

School Councils

Top Youth CouncilAugust 2007 – July 2010Lack of available space to site facilities.

Local residents objections

Available funding sources.
2.2 Increase facilities for young people that include the development of multi use games area’s, youth shelters and the improvement and development of skate parks.Reductions of vandalism in children’s play areas.

Providing young people with places to go and things to do.

Promote, provide and improve cultural and leisure facilities for all.

Ensuring that Waverley is a safe place.Parish and Town Councils.

Waverley Borough Council.

Resident Groups and Housing Developers.

Top Youth CouncilAugust 2007 – July 2010Lack of available space to site facilities.

Local residents objections

Available funding sources.
**This action is subject to funding being secured through the Big Lottery Fund to enable a Play Development Officer to be appointed. A further report will be brought back to Members when the funding is available to consider the financial implications.
2.3 Upgrade of equipment within local play areas where required across the borough.

Include/add equipment for older children where feasible.Ensure the high maintenance & safety standards of all areas.

Increase opportunities children over 9 yrs to continue to use play equipment.Promote, provide and improve cultural and leisure facilities for all.

Parish and Town Councils.

Waverley Borough Council.

Resident Groups and Housing Developers.

School Councils

Top Youth CouncilSome of Waverley Borough Council owned playgrounds are presently being refurbished aim to be completed by December 2008

Parish or developer owned August 2007 – July 2010Lack of sufficient funding to meet needs.

Lack of available space to increase facilities.

Local residents objections to development of play for older children
2.4 Development of more ‘natural’ play areas including surrounding open space where possible.
A more exciting and diverse play experience for children.

Allows a child to have more freedom when playing.Promote, provide and improve cultural and leisure facilities for allParish and Town Councils.

Waverley Borough Council.

Resident Groups and Housing Developers.

School Councils

Top Youth CouncilAugust 2007 – July 2010Local residents objections

Available funding sources.

Lack of available space to increase facilities.
2.5 Increase the amount of inclusive play equipment within the play areas.

Improved access to play opportunities for children with disabilitiesPromote, provide and improve cultural and leisure facilities for all Waverley Borough Council.

Parish and Town Councils.

Disability organisations and schoolsAugust 2007 – July 2010Available funding sources
3.0 Objective - Improve access to supervised play opportunities
Action PointExpected BenefitsLinks to Corporate GoalsLead PartnersTarget DateRisk/Other Issues
3.1 Increase awareness of the range of supervised play opportunities available across the borough.
** See footnoteIncreased information to parents on supervised provision.

Increase in the number of children attending supervised play opportunities.Promote, provide and improve cultural and leisure facilities for all Waverley Borough Council.

Early Years and Childcare Service.Commence April 2008Available funding for promotional material.

Unable to secure funding to appoint a Play Development Officer
3.2 Work with partners to identify possibilities to develop/expand holiday schemes with reduced prices for families on low incomes.
** See footnoteIncreased provision for families on low incomes to access in the holidays.Promote, provide and improve cultural and leisure facilities for allWaverley Borough CouncilCommence April 2008 Unable to secure funding to appoint a Play Development Officer
4.0 Objective - Ensure effective implementation of the play strategy and action plan
Action PointExpected BenefitsLinks to Corporate GoalsLead PartnersTarget DateRisk/Other Issues
4.1 Maintain the establishment of the multi-agency ‘Play Strategy Steering Group’.Ensure the delivery of the action plan within the strategy and is adopted into the strategic planning process of the Council.Promote, provide and improve cultural and leisure facilities for all.

Ensuring that Waverley is a safe place.Waverley Borough Council and the Play Strategy Steering GroupLifespan of Play Strategy August 2007 – July 2010Lack of human resources
**This action is subject to funding being secured through the Big Lottery Fund to enable a Play Development Officer to be appointed. A further report will be brought back to Members when the funding is available to consider the financial implications.
4.2 Review play services and identify gaps in provision.
** See footnoteGaps in provision are identified and processes put in place to address the issues.Promote, provide and improve cultural and leisure facilities for all.

Waverley Borough Council - Play Development Officer

Parish and Town Councils Commence April 2008Available sources of funding.

Lack of human resources
4.3 Identify financial resources & investments needed to underpin & maintain services.
** See footnoteEnable the development of further play provision for children and young people living in Waverley.Promote, provide and improve cultural and leisure facilities for all.Waverley Borough Council - Play Development OfficerCommence April 2008Available sources of funding.

Lack of human resources
4.4 Evaluation of the Strategy and delivery of action plan.
** See footnoteWill ensure that the action plan is being delivered that consultation is continuing partners, stakeholders and users and that quality provision is being developed and improvedPromote, provide and improve cultural and leisure facilities for all.Waverley Borough Council - Play Development OfficerCommence April 2008Available sources of funding.

Lack of human resources
5.0 Objective – Increasing Provision –
Target resources to the areas of greatest need for play improvements
Action PointExpected BenefitsLinks to Corporate GoalsLead PartnersTarget DateRisk/Other Issues
5.1 Map distribution of current play provision.
** See footnoteIdentify areas of the borough that have are lacking in aspects of play provision Promote, provide and improve cultural and leisure facilities for all.

Ensuring that Waverley is a safe place.Waverley Borough Council - Play Development Officer

Parish and Town CouncilsCommence April 2008Available sources of funding.

Lack of human resources
**This action is subject to funding being secured through the Big Lottery Fund to enable a Play Development Officer to be appointed. A further report will be brought back to Members when the funding is available to consider the financial implications.
5.2 Support existing play provision and respond to local need to develop further provision where appropriate.
** See footnoteEnsure current play provision is maintained in areas where it is well supported.

Target areas of need to develop new provision when possible.Promote, provide and improve cultural and leisure facilities for all.
Waverley Borough Council - Play Development Officer

Parish and Town Councils

Early Years and Childcare Service.Commence April 2008Available sources of funding.

Lack of human resources
5.3 Plan for the development of an open space study. (PPG17)
Identify a clear picture of the open spaces in the borough, as this would contribute when planning for development of future play provision.Promote, provide and improve cultural and leisure facilities for all.Waverley Borough Council – Planning
Parks and CountrysideSummer 2008Available sources of funding.

Lack of human resources
6.0 Objective - Development of play frameworks
Action PointExpected BenefitsLinks to Corporate GoalsLead PartnersTarget DateRisk/Other Issues
6.1 Ensure Best Play Objectives and the Enriched Play Environment Criteria are distributed to those who develop play areas. Ensures that future developments provide as many play opportunities as possible. Waverley Borough Council and the Play Strategy Steering Group From adoption of Strategy - August 2007 – July 2010. Lack of human resources
**This action is subject to funding being secured through the Big Lottery Fund to enable a Play Development Officer to be appointed. A further report will be brought back to Members when the funding is available to consider the financial implications.
6.2 Incorporate the Best Play Objectives and Enriched Play Environment Criteria into the evaluation of WBC Community Partnership fund applications where applicable.Ensures that organisations applying for funding for play projects will provide as many play opportunities as possible. Promote, provide and improve cultural and leisure facilities for all.Waverley Borough Council and the Play Strategy Steering Group From adoption of Strategy - August 2007 – July 2010. Available sources of funding

Lack of human resources
6.3 Ensure communities are consulted regularly and children and young peoples views are actively sought.Will assist with increasing the amount of consultation with children and young people and will ensure that new initiatives are developed based on their needs and requirements.Promote, provide and improve cultural and leisure facilities for all.Waverley Borough Council and the Play Strategy Steering Group. From adoption of Strategy - August 2007 – July 2010. Lack of human resources
6.4 The Play Safety Forum position statement is taken into account when making judgements on managing risk in all play provision.
** See footnote. Ensures play facilities take account of the risks, but also allow as much freedom to play as possible. Promote, provide and improve cultural and leisure facilities for all.

Ensuring that Waverley is a safe place.Waverley Borough Council – Play Development officer and
Parks and CountrysideCommencing April 2008Lack of human resources
7.0 - Objective - Commitment
Action PointExpected BenefitsLinks to Corporate GoalsLead PartnersTarget DateRisk/Other Issues
7.1 Ensure Play is included in the Local Strategic Partnership’s Community Strategy. Ensures the play policy is incorporated and adopted into planning, transport, community safety policy and others as appropriate. Ensuring that Waverley is a safe place. Waverley Borough Council and the Play Strategy Steering Group From adoption of Strategy - August 2007 – July 2010. Lack of human resources
7.2 Incorporate the play policy into WBC’s relevant Development Plans and Supplementary Planning Documents, to form parts of the Local Development Framework. Ensure the delivery of the action plan within the strategy is adopted into the strategic planning process of the Council. Promote, provide and improve cultural and leisure facilities for all.

Ensuring that Waverley is a safe place. Waverley Borough Council and the Play Strategy Steering Group. From adoption of Strategy - August 2007 – July 2010. Lack of human resources
7.3 Ensure the Enriched Play Environment Criteria are included in the development control process when design briefs on new developments are established. Ensure the delivery of the action plan within the strategy is adopted into all strategic planning processes of the Council. Promote, provide and improve cultural and leisure facilities for all.

Ensuring that Waverley is a safe place. Waverley Borough Council and the Play Strategy Steering Group. From adoption of Strategy - August 2007 – July 2010. Lack of human resources

**This action is subject to funding being secured through the Big Lottery Fund to enable a Play Development Officer to be appointed. A further report will be brought back to Members when the funding is available to consider the financial implications.


Appendix 1
Play Value Score

Play AreaOwnerSite Feature ScoreToddlerJuniorTeenager
Recreation Centre, CrosswaysAlfold Parish Council
Eastwood Road Play AreaBramley Parish Council
Coxcombe Lane Chiddingfold parish Council
King George V Playing FieldsDunsfold Parish Council
Snoxall Playing FieldsCranleigh Parish Council
Memorial HallEwhurst Parish Council
Recreation GroundEwhurst Parish Council
LadymeadWaverley Borough Council
1
8
6
2
Chestnut WayWaverley Borough Council
9
6
6
6
HascombeWaverley Borough Council
4
10
10
10
Coxcombe LaneWaverley Borough Council
5
4
10
8
QueenswayWaverley Borough Council
2
6
2
0
Lashmere Rec.WBC
8
4
8
8
Cranleigh Skate parkWBC
2
0
8
8
Downhurst Rd. WBC
4
2
4
2
Beacon HillWBC
11
6
18
12
Eight AcresWBC
1
1
9
9
Tilford Rd.WBC
3
2
4
2
The BourneWBC
5
7
13
2
The ChantrysWBC
2
10
10
2
Farnham Park St JamesWBC
4
4
4
2
Farnham Park AdventureWBC
5
5
23
18
Farnham Leisure Skate ParkWBC
2
0
8
8
Gostrey MeadowWBC
Marsden Rec.WBC
3
0
2
2
Oast House CrescentWBC
2
2
2
2
Heath End Rec.WBC
5
4
10
8
White Cottage Cl.WBC
0
4
4
2
Roman WayWBC
6
4
8
8
BaldreysWBC
5
8
14
8
MiddlefieldWBC
5
6
6
6
Hale Rec.WBC
11
10
16
8
Morley RoadWBC
5
4
10
8
Wentworth CloseWBC
5
9
8
4
Badshot Lea Green WBC
5
6
9
7
Beldams WBC
5
4
8
8
Rowledge Rec.WBC
4
6
16
12
Wrecclesham Rec.WBC
4
8
19
12
Hollowdene Rec.Frensham Parish Council
Shepherds WayTilford Parish Council
The StreetDockenfield Parish Council
Abbots CottagesWBC
2
4
2
2
Boundstone RecWBC
0
2
2
2
Langham’s RecWBC
5
2
2
2
PeakfieldsWBC
5
6
6
2
Combe RoadWBC
4
2
2
2
Longbourne GreenWBC
4
2
7
2
NorthbourneWBC
3
13
8
Aarons HillWBC
9
13
35
24
Ockford RidgeWBC
4
2
2
2
Philips Memorial GroundWBC
5
9
11
Broadwater ParkWBC
7
20
13
2
Canon BowringsWBC
5
4
15
8
Crown PitsWBC
5
4
4
Holloway HillWBC
5
10
20
17
Lion GreenHaslemere Town Council
Witley Rec.Witley Parish Council
Jubilee FieldWitley Parish Council
Amberley RoadWBC
5
6
6
2
Cedar LodgeWBC
0
6
6
2
SunnyhillWBC
5
6
8
2
MiddlemarchWBC
0
2
4
4
Border RoadWBC
1
5
4
0
Oak CottagesWBC
2
4
4
0
SicklemillWBC
4
6
9
0
Herons Skate ParkWBC
6
0
14
14
Woolmer HillWBC
Grayswood Rec.WBC
5
10
10
10
Haslemere Rec.WBC
4
19
16
8
High Lane Rec.WBC
5
10
16
10
Town MeadowWBC
4
8
9
7
Play Value Totals
325
510
318

This shows the play value scores for each age group for each play area covered in the study. Teenagers have the lowest play value score (318), while the juniors have the highest play value score (510).

Appendix 2

Afterschool Clubs

Chiddingfold and Dunsfold
Cranleigh East
Cranleigh West (just breakfast club)
Ewhurst
Farnham Castle
Farnham Firgrove
Farnham Moor Park
Farnham Shortheath and Boundstone
Farnham Upper Hale
Farnham Weybourne and Badshot Lea
Godalming Central and Ockford
Haslemere Critchmere and Shottermill
Haslemere East and Grayswood
Hindhead

Holiday playschemes

Cranleigh East 1
Cranleigh West 2
Elstead and Thursley 1
Farnham Bourne 3
Farnham Moor Park 2
Farnham Upper Hale 1
Farnham Weybourne and Badshot Lea 1
Farnham Wrecclesham and Rowledge 1
Frensham, Dockenfield & Tilford 1
Godalming Charterhouse 1
Godalming Farncombe & Catteshall 1
Haslemere Shottermill & Critchmere 2
Hindhead 2
Milford 1
Further information after school clubs and holiday playschemes is available on the Surrey County Council Website


Appendix 3 Acknowledgements

Top Youth Council – Waverley

Skater Focus Groups – Farnham and Cranleigh

Schools
Farncombe Infant School
Beacon Hill Infant and Junior School – Haslemere
Hale Infant and Junior School – Farnham
Moss Lane Infant School - Godalming
St Nicholas Infant School – Cranleigh
Godalming County School
Grayswood Infant School
The Bourne Infant School – Farnham

Waverley Town and Parish Councils

Parent and Teacher Associations

Play Strategy Steering Group
Community Development Officer – Youth – Waverley Borough Council
Leisure Officer – Waverley Borough Council
Health Check Co-ordinators – Godalming, Haslemere and Cranleigh
Farnham Town Council Representative
Parish Council Representative from the Local Strategic Partnership
Surrey Voluntary Services – children and young people representatives/rural worker
Surrey County Council Early Years and Childcare Service
Parks and Countryside Officers – Waverley Borough Council
Planning Department – Waverley Borough Council
Housing Department - Waverley Borough Council
Surrey Youth Service
Disability Challengers
Portfolio Holder for Children and Young People - Waverley Borough Council